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Thorvald, P., Lindblom, J. & Kolbeinsson, A. (2020). Embodied Interactions in Cognitive Manufacturing. In: Hasan Ayaz (Ed.), Advances in Neuroergonomics and Cognitive Engineering: Proceedings of the AHFE 2019 International Conference on Neuroergonomics and Cognitive Engineering, and the AHFE International Conference on Industrial Cognitive Ergonomics and Engineering Psychology, July 24-28, 2019, Washington D.C., USA. Paper presented at International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics (AHFE), Washington D.C, USA, 24-28 July, 2019 (pp. 419-426). Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Embodied Interactions in Cognitive Manufacturing
2020 (English)In: Advances in Neuroergonomics and Cognitive Engineering: Proceedings of the AHFE 2019 International Conference on Neuroergonomics and Cognitive Engineering, and the AHFE International Conference on Industrial Cognitive Ergonomics and Engineering Psychology, July 24-28, 2019, Washington D.C., USA / [ed] Hasan Ayaz, Springer, 2020, p. 419-426Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This paper presents a discussion on the role of embodied interaction with a basis in social embodiment effects and how they can be viewed in light of manufacturing ergonomics. The social embodiment effects are four statements, grounded in empirical findings, which highlight the interplay of social stimuli, embodied responses, and cognitive processing. They suggest and base an argument for how embodiment is central to cognitive processing, how bodily states interact extensively with cognitive states, and ultimately how embodied interaction is ubiquitous in human cognition. The paper further presents a view on how human based manufacturing can be studied in light of this argument, exploring other areas where social embodiment has been further researched, with an aim to suggest examples of where social embodiment effects might be found in manufacturing ergonomics and form a basis for future investigations. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2020
Series
Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, ISSN 2194-5357, E-ISSN 2194-5365 ; 953
Keywords
Human based manufacturing·ergonomics, Manufacturing, Social embodiment·cognition, Economic and social effects, Manufacture, Cognitive processing, Cognitive state, Embodied interaction, Empirical findings, Human cognition, Ergonomics
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics
Research subject
User Centred Product Design; Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-17416 (URN)10.1007/978-3-030-20473-0_41 (DOI)2-s2.0-85067652021 (Scopus ID)978-3-030-20472-3 (ISBN)978-3-030-20473-0 (ISBN)
Conference
International Conference on Applied Human Factors and Ergonomics (AHFE), Washington D.C, USA, 24-28 July, 2019
Available from: 2019-07-09 Created: 2019-07-09 Last updated: 2019-11-08Bibliographically approved
van Laere, J. & Lindblom, J. (2019). Cultivating a longitudinal learning process through recurring crisis management training exercises in twelve Swedish municipalities. Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, 27(1), 38-49
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Cultivating a longitudinal learning process through recurring crisis management training exercises in twelve Swedish municipalities
2019 (English)In: Journal of Contingencies and Crisis Management, ISSN 0966-0879, E-ISSN 1468-5973, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 38-49Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study illustrates how crisis management capability is developed in series ofrecurring exercises, rather than in one single exercise. Over one hundred table-topand role-playing exercises were performed and evaluated in a longitudinal cross-caseaction research study in 12 Swedish municipalities. By consciously adapting trainingformats, municipalities were lead through three learning phases: obtaining roleunderstanding (phase 1: knowing what to do), developing information managementskills (phase 2: knowing how to do it), and mastering self-reflection in regular time-outs (phase 3: knowing when and why to do something). This final learning out-come, being able to concurrently execute, evaluate, and reorganize an ongoing crisismanagement performance, may be the most valuable capability of a crisis manage-ment organization when crisis strikes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2019
Keywords
crisis management, exercise, gaming, gaming simulation, learning, Sweden, training
National Category
Information Systems, Social aspects
Research subject
Information Systems; Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-15893 (URN)10.1111/1468-5973.12230 (DOI)000459310900004 ()2-s2.0-85061907416 (Scopus ID)
Funder
Swedish Civil Contingencies Agency, 0836/2005
Available from: 2018-06-30 Created: 2018-06-30 Last updated: 2019-03-08
Billing, E., Rosén, J. & Lindblom, J. (2019). Expectations of robot technology in welfare. In: : . Paper presented at The second workshop on social robots in therapy and care in conjunction with the 14th ACM / IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI 2019), Daegu, Korea, March 11–14 2019.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Expectations of robot technology in welfare
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We report findings from a survey on expectations of robot technology in welfare, within the coming 20 years. 34 assistant nurses answered a questionnaire on which tasks, from their daily work, that they believe robots can perform, already today or in the near future. Additionally, the Negative attitudes toward robots scale (NARS) was used to estimate participants' attitudes towards robots in general. Results reveal high expectations of robots, where at least half of the participants answered Already today or Within 10 years to 9 out of 10 investigated tasks. Participants were also fairly positive towards robots, reporting low scores on NARS. The obtained results can be interpreted as a serious over-estimation of what robots will be able to do in the near future, but also large varieties in participants' interpretation of what robots are. We identify challenges in communicating both excitement towards a technology in rapid development and realistic limitations of this technology.

Keywords
attitudes towards robots, human-robot interaction, robots in healthcare
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16691 (URN)
Conference
The second workshop on social robots in therapy and care in conjunction with the 14th ACM / IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI 2019), Daegu, Korea, March 11–14 2019
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 611391
Available from: 2019-03-12 Created: 2019-03-12 Last updated: 2019-05-23Bibliographically approved
Kolbeinsson, A., Lagerstedt, E. & Lindblom, J. (2019). Foundation for a classification of collaboration levels for human-robot cooperation in manufacturing. Production & Manufacturing Research, 7(1), 448-471
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Foundation for a classification of collaboration levels for human-robot cooperation in manufacturing
2019 (English)In: Production & Manufacturing Research, ISSN 2169-3277, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 448-471Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Industry 4.0 aims to support the factory of the future, involving increased use of information systems and new ways of using automation, such as collaboration where a robot and a human share work on a single task. We propose a classification of collaboration levels for Human-Robot collaboration (HRC) in manufacturing that we call levels of collaboration (LoC), formed to provide a conceptual model conducive to the design of assembly lines incorporating HRC. This paper aims to provide a more theoretical foundation for such a tool based on relevant theories from cognitive science and other perspectives of human-technology interaction, strengthening the validity and scientific rigour of the envisioned LoC tool. The main contributions consist of a theoretical grounding to motivate the transition from automation to collaboration, which are intended to facilitate expanding the LoC classification to support HRC, as well as an initial visualization of the LoC approach. Future work includes fully defining the LoC classification as well as operationalizing functionally different cooperation types. We conclude that collaboration is a means to an end, so collaboration is not entered for its own sake, and that collaboration differs fundamentally from more commonly used views where automation is the focus.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2019
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Research subject
User Centred Product Design; Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-17502 (URN)10.1080/21693277.2019.1645628 (DOI)000477742200001 ()2-s2.0-85069762392 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2019-08-08 Created: 2019-08-08 Last updated: 2019-11-13Bibliographically approved
Thorvald, P., Lindblom, J. & Andreasson, R. (2019). On the development of a method for cognitive load assessment in manufacturing. Robotics and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing, 59, 252-266
Open this publication in new window or tab >>On the development of a method for cognitive load assessment in manufacturing
2019 (English)In: Robotics and Computer-Integrated Manufacturing, ISSN 0736-5845, E-ISSN 1879-2537, Vol. 59, p. 252-266Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The increasing complexity and demands of assembly operations in manufacturing has been shown to lead to increased cognitive load in assembly workers. Previous work has outlined the complexity of an assembly worker's situation both in terms of difficulty and speed of work and there have been a few attempts at creating frameworks and methods for understanding the key aspects of what creates increased cognitive load. This paper presents the development of an analytic method, denoted CLAM (Cognitive Load Assessment for Manufacturing), and a tool for assessing cognitive load in manufacturing, primarily assembly. It outlines the journey of the development as well as discusses and problematizes relevant meta-methodological issues paired with method development. The intended contribution of the work is to make a difference in reducing the cognitive load of assembly workers on the shop floor, thus focusing the development on applicability and usability of the tool in practice. With this purpose in mind, focus of the method development has been on the practitioners, i.e. the method should not require any expert knowledge to be applied. The CLAM method and accompanying documentation such as a handbook containing instructions towards using the method and interpreting the results, is available in an online tool.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019
Keywords
Cognitive load, Manufacturing, Assembly, Method development, CLAM method
National Category
Production Engineering, Human Work Science and Ergonomics Interaction Technologies
Research subject
Interaction Lab (ILAB); User Centred Product Design
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16863 (URN)10.1016/j.rcim.2019.04.012 (DOI)000472694400022 ()2-s2.0-85064707617 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Sense&React
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, FP7-314350
Available from: 2019-05-03 Created: 2019-05-03 Last updated: 2019-09-30Bibliographically approved
Andreasson, R., Jansson, A. A. & Lindblom, J. (2019). Past and Future Challenges for Railway Research and the Role of a Systems Perspective. In: Sebastiano Bagnara, Riccardo Tartaglia, Sara Albolino, Thomas Alexander, Yushi Fujita (Ed.), Proceedings of the 20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association (IEA 2018): Volume VII: Ergonomics in Design, Design for All, Activity Theories for Work Analysis and Design, Affective Design (pp. 1737-1746). Cham: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Past and Future Challenges for Railway Research and the Role of a Systems Perspective
2019 (English)In: Proceedings of the 20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association (IEA 2018): Volume VII: Ergonomics in Design, Design for All, Activity Theories for Work Analysis and Design, Affective Design / [ed] Sebastiano Bagnara, Riccardo Tartaglia, Sara Albolino, Thomas Alexander, Yushi Fujita, Cham: Springer, 2019, p. 1737-1746Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Operational train traffic is dependent on an efficient traffic plan monitored and executed by the traffic controllers, the proficient maneuvering of the trains by the train drivers, and on the interaction, communication, and coordination between these two work roles. The railway research community, and the branch of industry itself, has called for an integrated systems perspective for the whole train traffic system to achieve an efficient performance. As human-human and human-technology interactions are natural parts of the socio-technical system of train traffic, the aim of this paper is to provide illustrative examples for why a systems perspective is needed for the future of railway research. Furthermore, we present the theoretical framework of distributed cognition (DCog) as a necessary addition to the theoretical and methodological toolbox of the Human Factors and Ergonomics (HF&E) discipline. To realize efficient and coordinated processes involved in organizing and executing operational train traffic, the paper proposes that the DCog framework should be implemented in the train traffic domain as a viable approach forward.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Cham: Springer, 2019
Series
Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, ISSN 2194-5357, E-ISSN 2194-5365 ; 824
Keywords
Train traffic, Distributed cognition, Safety-critical systems, Systems perspective
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Research subject
Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16044 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-96071-5_178 (DOI)000473061800167 ()2-s2.0-85052309815 (Scopus ID)978-3-319-96070-8 (ISBN)978-3-319-96071-5 (ISBN)
Note

20th Congress of the International Ergonomics Association (IEA 2018), Florence, 31st August and 1st September 2018

Available from: 2018-08-13 Created: 2018-08-13 Last updated: 2019-07-22Bibliographically approved
Andreasson, R., Jansson, A. A. & Lindblom, J. (2019). The coordination between train traffic controllers and train drivers: a distributed cognition perspective on railway. Cognition, Technology & Work, 21(3), 417-443
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The coordination between train traffic controllers and train drivers: a distributed cognition perspective on railway
2019 (English)In: Cognition, Technology & Work, ISSN 1435-5558, E-ISSN 1435-5566, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 417-443Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Although there has long been a call for a holistic systems perspective to better understand real work in the complex domain of railway traffic, prior research has not strongly emphasised the socio-technical perspective. In operational railway traffic, the successful planning and execution of the traffic are the product of the socio-technical system comprised by both train drivers and traffic controllers. This paper presents a study inspired by cognitive ethnography with the aim to characterise the coordinating activities that are conducted by train traffic controllers and train drivers in the work practices of the socio-technical system of Swedish railway. The theoretical framework of distributed cognition (DCog) is used as a conceptual and analytical tool to make sense of the complex railway domain and the best practices as they are developed and performed “in the wild”. The analysis reveals a pattern of collaboration and coordination of actions among the workers and we introduce the concept of enacted actionable practices as a key concern for understanding how a successfully executed railway traffic emerges as a property of the socio-technical system. The implications for future railway research are briefly discussed.

Keywords
Distributed cognition, DCog, Railway, Rail human factors
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Research subject
Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16036 (URN)10.1007/s10111-018-0513-z (DOI)000478042500005 ()2-s2.0-85051644932 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2018-08-06 Created: 2018-08-06 Last updated: 2019-11-18Bibliographically approved
Kolbeinsson, A., Lagerstedt, E. & Lindblom, J. (2018). Classification of Collaboration Levels for Human-Robot Cooperation in Manufacturing. In: Peter Thorvald & Keith Case (Ed.), Peter Thorvald, Keith Case (Ed.), Advances in Manufacturing Technology XXXII: Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Manufacturing Research, incorporating the 33rd National Conference on Manufacturing Research, September 11–13, 2018,  University of Skövde, Sweden. Paper presented at 16th International Conference on Manufacturing Research, incorporating the 33rd National Conference on Manufacturing Research, September 11–13, 2018, University of Skövde, Sweden (pp. 151-156). Amsterdam: IOS Press
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Classification of Collaboration Levels for Human-Robot Cooperation in Manufacturing
2018 (English)In: Advances in Manufacturing Technology XXXII: Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Manufacturing Research, incorporating the 33rd National Conference on Manufacturing Research, September 11–13, 2018,  University of Skövde, Sweden / [ed] Peter Thorvald, Keith Case, Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2018, p. 151-156Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Industry 4.0 aims to support the factory of the future, which involves increased amounts of information systems and new ways of using automation. One new usage is collaboration between human and industrial robot in manufacturing, with both partners sharing work on a single task. Supporting human-robot collaboration (HRC) requires understanding the requirements of HRC as well as the differences to existing approaches where the goal is more automation, such as in the case of self-driving cars. We propose a framework that we call levels of collaboration to support this, and posit that this framework supports a mental model conducive to the design of lines incorporating HRC.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Amsterdam: IOS Press, 2018
Series
Advances in Transdisciplinary Engineering, ISSN 2352-751X, E-ISSN 2352-7528 ; 8
Keywords
Human-robot collaboration, Manufacturing, Industry 4.0
National Category
Robotics
Research subject
INF302 Autonomous Intelligent Systems; User Centred Product Design; Interaction Lab (ILAB); INF202 Virtual Ergonomics
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16117 (URN)10.3233/978-1-61499-902-7-151 (DOI)000462212700025 ()2-s2.0-85057431589 (Scopus ID)978-1-61499-901-0 (ISBN)978-1-61499-902-7 (ISBN)
Conference
16th International Conference on Manufacturing Research, incorporating the 33rd National Conference on Manufacturing Research, September 11–13, 2018, University of Skövde, Sweden
Projects
KK-stiftelsen AIR - SIDUS nr 20140220ManuWork (EU) nr 723711
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 723711Knowledge Foundation, 20140220
Note

Detta arbete är finansierat både av AIR(KK)  och ManuWork (EU).

Available from: 2018-08-31 Created: 2018-08-31 Last updated: 2019-04-05Bibliographically approved
Lundström, C. & Lindblom, J. (2018). Considering farmers' situated knowledge of using agricultural decision support systems (AgriDSS) to Foster farming practices: The case of CropSAT. Agricultural Systems, 159, 9-20
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Considering farmers' situated knowledge of using agricultural decision support systems (AgriDSS) to Foster farming practices: The case of CropSAT
2018 (English)In: Agricultural Systems, ISSN 0308-521X, E-ISSN 1873-2267, Vol. 159, p. 9-20Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Precision agriculture is an important part of the sustainable intensification of agriculture, where information and communications technology and other technologies are necessary, but not sufficient for sustainable farming systems. The technology must fit into farmers' practice and be handled by their experienced-based, situated knowledge in order to contribute to increased sustainability in their farming. This study analysed the relationship between farmers' experience-based situated knowledge and the use of agricultural decision support systems in order to develop care by farmers in their practice. The theoretical framework of distributed cognition was used as a lens when investigating and analysing farmers' use of an agricultural decision support system called CropSAT developed for calculation of variable rate application files for nitrogen fertilisation from satellite images. In the case study, the unit of analysis was broadened to the whole socio-technical system of farmers' decision-making and learning, including other people and different kinds of tools and artefacts. The results revealed that social contexts could support farmers' development of cognitive strategies for use of agricultural decision support systems, e.g. CropSAT, and could thus facilitate decision-making and learning through development of enhanced professional vision that hopefully may increase farmers' situated knowledge and care in PA.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2018
Keywords
Precision agriculture, Agricultural decision support systems, Sustainable intensification, Distributed cognition, Learning, Care
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Research subject
Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14251 (URN)10.1016/j.agsy.2017.10.004 (DOI)000419415700002 ()2-s2.0-85031121584 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Biological Soil Mapping (BioSoM) at NJ Faculty, SLU ua Fe 2012.5.1-3936, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
Note

This work was financially supported by the thematic research programme Biological Soil Mapping (BioSoM) at NJ Faculty, SLU ua Fe 2012.5.1-3936, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.

Available from: 2017-10-24 Created: 2017-10-24 Last updated: 2018-02-16Bibliographically approved
Alenljung, B., Andreasson, R., Lowe, R., Billing, E. & Lindblom, J. (2018). Conveying Emotions by Touch to the Nao Robot: A User Experience Perspective. Multimodal Technologies and Interaction, 2(4), Article ID 82.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Conveying Emotions by Touch to the Nao Robot: A User Experience Perspective
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2018 (English)In: Multimodal Technologies and Interaction, ISSN 2414-4088, Vol. 2, no 4, article id 82Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Social robots are expected gradually to be used by more and more people in a widerrange of settings, domestic as well as professional. As a consequence, the features and qualityrequirements on human–robot interaction will increase, comprising possibilities to communicateemotions, establishing a positive user experience, e.g., using touch. In this paper, the focus is ondepicting how humans, as the users of robots, experience tactile emotional communication with theNao Robot, as well as identifying aspects affecting the experience and touch behavior. A qualitativeinvestigation was conducted as part of a larger experiment. The major findings consist of 15 differentaspects that vary along one or more dimensions and how those influence the four dimensions ofuser experience that are present in the study, as well as the different parts of touch behavior ofconveying emotions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
M D P I AG, 2018
National Category
Interaction Technologies
Research subject
Interaction Lab (ILAB); INF302 Autonomous Intelligent Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16507 (URN)10.3390/mti2040082 (DOI)
Funder
Region Västra GötalandKnowledge Foundation, 20140220
Available from: 2018-12-18 Created: 2018-12-18 Last updated: 2019-11-19Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0003-0946-7531

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