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Vernon, David
Publications (10 of 18) Show all publications
Cao, H.-L., Esteban, P. G., Bartlett, M., Baxter, P. E., Belpaeme, T., Billing, E., . . . Ziemke, T. (2019). Robot-Enhanced Therapy: Development and Validation of a Supervised Autonomous Robotic System for Autism Spectrum Disorders Therapy. IEEE robotics & automation magazine, 26(2), 49-58
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Robot-Enhanced Therapy: Development and Validation of a Supervised Autonomous Robotic System for Autism Spectrum Disorders Therapy
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2019 (English)In: IEEE robotics & automation magazine, ISSN 1070-9932, E-ISSN 1558-223X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 49-58Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), 2019
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16864 (URN)10.1109/MRA.2019.2904121 (DOI)000471680800008 ()2-s2.0-85064382580 (Scopus ID)
Projects
DREAM, FP7 grant #611391.
Available from: 2019-05-06 Created: 2019-05-06 Last updated: 2019-11-18Bibliographically approved
Esteban, P. G., Baxter, P., Belpaeme, T., Billing, E., Cai, H., Cao, H.-L., . . . Ziemke, T. (2017). How to Build a Supervised Autonomous System for Robot-Enhanced Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Paladyn - Journal of Behavioral Robotics, 8(1), 18-38
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How to Build a Supervised Autonomous System for Robot-Enhanced Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
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2017 (English)In: Paladyn - Journal of Behavioral Robotics, ISSN 2080-9778, E-ISSN 2081-4836, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 18-38Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Robot-Assisted Therapy (RAT) has successfully been used to improve social skills in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) through remote control of the robot in so-called Wizard of Oz (WoZ) paradigms.However, there is a need to increase the autonomy of the robot both to lighten the burden on human therapists (who have to remain in control and, importantly, supervise the robot) and to provide a consistent therapeutic experience. This paper seeks to provide insight into increasing the autonomy level of social robots in therapy to move beyond WoZ. With the final aim of improved human-human social interaction for the children, this multidisciplinary research seeks to facilitate the use of social robots as tools in clinical situations by addressing the challenge of increasing robot autonomy.We introduce the clinical framework in which the developments are tested, alongside initial data obtained from patients in a first phase of the project using a WoZ set-up mimicking the targeted supervised-autonomy behaviour. We further describe the implemented system architecture capable of providing the robot with supervised autonomy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
De Gruyter Open, 2017
Keywords
Robot-Enhanced Therapy, Autism Spectrum Disorders, Supervised Autonomy, Multi-sensory Data, Cognitive Controller
National Category
Computer and Information Sciences
Research subject
Interaction Lab (ILAB); INF302 Autonomous Intelligent Systems
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-13559 (URN)10.1515/pjbr-2017-0002 (DOI)2-s2.0-85031508273 (Scopus ID)
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 611391
Available from: 2017-05-16 Created: 2017-05-16 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
Vernon, D., von Hofsten, C. & Fadiga, L. (2016). Desiderata for developmental cognitive architectures. Biologically Inspired Cognitive Architectures, 18, 116-127
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Desiderata for developmental cognitive architectures
2016 (English)In: Biologically Inspired Cognitive Architectures, ISSN 2212-683X, E-ISSN 2212-6848, Vol. 18, p. 116-127Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This paper complements Ron Sun’s influential Desiderata for Cognitive Architectures by focussing on the desirable attributes of a biologically-inspired cognitive architecture for an agent with a capacity for autonomous development. Ten desiderata are identified, dealing with value systems & motives, embodiment, sensorimotor contingencies, perception, attention, prospective action, memory, learning, internal simulation, and constitutive autonomy. These desiderata are motivated by studies in developmental psychology, cognitive neuroscience, and enactive cognitive science. All ten focus on the ultimate aspects of cognitive development — why a feature is necessary and what it enables — rather on than the proximate mechanisms by which it can be realized. As such, the desiderata are for the most part neutral regarding the paradigm of cognitive science — cognitivist or emergent — that is adopted when designing a cognitive architecture. Where some element of a desideratum is specific to a particular paradigm, this is noted.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Cognition, robotics, development, cognitive architecture
National Category
Robotics
Research subject
Technology; Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-13050 (URN)10.1016/j.bica.2016.10.004 (DOI)000390513600011 ()2-s2.0-85005810408 (Scopus ID)
Projects
ROCKeu2
Funder
EU, Horizon 2020, 688441
Available from: 2016-10-25 Created: 2016-10-25 Last updated: 2018-09-10Bibliographically approved
Thill, S. & Vernon, D. (2016). How to Design Emergent Models of Cognition for Application-Driven Artificial Agents. In: Katherine Twomey, Gert Westermann, Padraic Monaghan and Alastair Smith (Ed.), Katherine Twomey, Gert Westermann, Padraic Monaghan & Alastair Smith (Ed.), Neurocomputational Models of Cognitive Development and Processing: Proceedings of the 14th Neural Computation and Psychology Workshop. Paper presented at 14th Neural Computation and Psychology Workshop, Lancaster University, UK, 21 – 23 August 2014 (pp. 115-129). Singapore: World Scientific
Open this publication in new window or tab >>How to Design Emergent Models of Cognition for Application-Driven Artificial Agents
2016 (English)In: Neurocomputational Models of Cognitive Development and Processing: Proceedings of the 14th Neural Computation and Psychology Workshop / [ed] Katherine Twomey, Gert Westermann, Padraic Monaghan & Alastair Smith, Singapore: World Scientific, 2016, p. 115-129Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Emergent models of cognition are attractive for artificial cognitive agents because they overcome the brittleness of systems that are fully specified in axiomatic terms at design time, increasing, for example, the ability to deal with uncertainty and unforeseen events. When the agent is created to fulfil specific requirements defined by a given application, there is an apparent conflict between the emergent (i.e. self-defining) nature of the agent's behaviour and the pre-specified (i.e. axiomatically-defined) nature of the requirements.

Here, we develop a framework for the design of emergent models of cognition whose behaviour can be shaped to fulfil application requirements while retaining the desired characteristics of emergence. We achieve this by viewing the artificial agent as forming an eco-system with the environment in which it is deployed. Consequently, the objective function that determines the agent's behaviour is cast in terms that factor in interaction with the environment (while not being controlled by it) and therefore implicitly includes the application requirements.

This framework is particularly relevant to application driven research where artificial agents are designed to interact with humans in a certain manner. We illustrate this with the example of robot-enhanced therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Singapore: World Scientific, 2016
Series
Progress in Neural Processing ; 22
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-12987 (URN)10.1142/9789814699341_0008 (DOI)978-981-4699-35-8 (ISBN)978-981-4699-33-4 (ISBN)
Conference
14th Neural Computation and Psychology Workshop, Lancaster University, UK, 21 – 23 August 2014
Available from: 2016-09-29 Created: 2016-09-29 Last updated: 2018-08-03Bibliographically approved
Vernon, D. (2016). Reconciling Constitutive and Behavioural Autonomy: The Challenge of Modelling Development in Enactive Cognition. Intellectica, 65, 63-79
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reconciling Constitutive and Behavioural Autonomy: The Challenge of Modelling Development in Enactive Cognition
2016 (English)In: Intellectica, ISSN 0769-4113, Vol. 65, p. 63-79Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In the enactive paradigm of cognitive science, development plays a crucial role in the realization of cognition. This position runs counter to the computational functionalism upon which cognitivist and classical artificial intelligence systems are founded, especially the assumption that cognition can be achieved by embedding pre-formed knowledge. The enactive stance involves a progressive phased transition from cognitive capacity to cognitive capability, highlighting the role of development in extending the timescale of a cognitive agent’s prospective abilities and in expanding its repertoire of effective action. We review briefly some necessary conditions for cognitive development, drawing on examples from developmental psychology, illustrating the ideas by looking at the ontogenesis of instru- mental helping and collaboration in infants, and identifying some of the essential elements of a developmental cognitive architecture. We then focus on the fact that enactive sys- tems are operationally-closed, autonomous, and self-maintaining. Consequently, there are organizational constitutive processes at play as well as behavioural ones. Reconciling these complementary processes poses a significant challenge for the creation of complete model of development that must show how constitutive autonomy is compatible with and may even give rise to behavioural autonomy. We conclude by drawing attention to recent research which could provide a way of addressing this challenge. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
France: French Association for Research on Cognition (ARCo), 2016
Keywords
behavioural autonomy, cognitive architecture, constitutive autonomy, development, enaction, ontogeny, phylogeny, value systems
National Category
Computer Vision and Robotics (Autonomous Systems)
Research subject
Technology; Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-12709 (URN)
Available from: 2016-07-12 Created: 2016-07-12 Last updated: 2018-09-10Bibliographically approved
Vernon, D., Thill, S. & Ziemke, T. (2016). The Role of Intention in Cognitive Robotics. In: Anna Esposito & Lakhmi C. Jain (Ed.), Toward Robotic Socially Believable Behaving Systems: Volume I (pp. 15-27). Switzerland: Springer
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Role of Intention in Cognitive Robotics
2016 (English)In: Toward Robotic Socially Believable Behaving Systems: Volume I / [ed] Anna Esposito & Lakhmi C. Jain, Switzerland: Springer, 2016, p. 15-27Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

We argue that the development of robots that can interact effectively with people requires a special focus on building systems that can perceive and comprehend intentions in other agents. Such a capability is a prerequisite for all pro-social behaviour and in particular underpins the ability to engage in instrumental helping and mutual collaboration. We explore the prospective and intentional nature of action, highlighting the importance of joint action, shared goals, shared intentions, and joint attention in facilitating social interaction between two or more cognitive agents. We discuss the link between reading intentions and theory of mind, noting the role played by internal simulation, especially when inferring higher-level actionfocussed intentions. Finally, we highlight that pro-social behaviour in humans is the result of a developmental process and we note the implications of this for the challenge of creating cognitive robots that can read intentions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Switzerland: Springer, 2016
Series
Intelligent Systems Reference Library, ISSN 1868-4394 ; 105
Keywords
Robotics, Human-robot interaction, emotion, intention
National Category
Robotics
Research subject
Technology; Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-11945 (URN)10.1007/978-3-319-31056-5_3 (DOI)000377156400004 ()2-s2.0-84961627492 (Scopus ID)978-3-319-31055-8 (ISBN)
Projects
DREAM: Development of Robot-enhanced Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 611391
Available from: 2016-02-23 Created: 2016-02-23 Last updated: 2018-08-03Bibliographically approved
Vernon, D., Billing, E., Hemeren, P., Thill, S. & Ziemke, T. (2015). An Architecture-oriented Approach to System Integration in Collaborative Robotics Research Projects: An Experience Report. Journal of Software Engineering for Robotics, 6(1), 15-32
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Architecture-oriented Approach to System Integration in Collaborative Robotics Research Projects: An Experience Report
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Software Engineering for Robotics, ISSN 2035-3928, E-ISSN 2035-3928, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 15-32Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Effective system integration requires strict adherence to strong software engineering standards, a practice not much favoured in many collaborative research projects. We argue that component-based software engineering (CBSE) provides a way to overcome this problem because it provides flexibility for developers while requiring the adoption of only a modest number of software engineering practices. This focus on integration complements software re-use, the more usual motivation for adopting CBSE. We illustrate our argument by showing how a large-scale system architecture for an application in the domain of robot-enhanced therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been implemented. We highlight the manner in which the integration process is facilitated by the architecture implementation of a set of placeholder components that comprise stubs for all functional primitives, as well as the complete implementation of all inter-component communications. We focus on the component-port-connector meta-model and show that the YARP robot platform is a well-matched middleware framework for the implementation of this model. To facilitate the validation of port-connector communication, we configure the initial placeholder implementation of the system architecture as a discrete event simulation and control the invocation of each component’s stub primitives probabilistically. This allows the system integrator to adjust the rate of inter-component communication while respecting its asynchronous and concurrent character. Also, individual ports and connectors can be periodically selected as the simulator cycles through each primitive in each sub-system component. This ability to control the rate of connector communication considerably eases the task of validating component-port-connector behaviour in a large system. Ultimately, over and above its well-accepted benefits for software re-use in robotics, CBSE strikes a good balance between software engineering best practice and the socio-technical problem of managing effective integration in collaborative robotics research projects. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Dalmine: , 2015
Keywords
best practice in robotics, model-driven engineering, component-based software engineering, discrete event simulation, YARP, component-port-connector model
National Category
Robotics
Research subject
Technology; Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-11922 (URN)
Projects
European Commission, Project 611391: DREAM — Development of Robot-enhanced Therapy for Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders
Funder
EU, FP7, Seventh Framework Programme, 611391
Available from: 2016-02-12 Created: 2016-02-12 Last updated: 2018-08-03Bibliographically approved
Vernon, D., Lowe, R., Thill, S. & Ziemke, T. (2015). Embodied cognition and circular causality: On the role of constitutive autonomy in the reciprocal coupling of perception and action. Frontiers in Psychology, 6, Article ID 1660.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Embodied cognition and circular causality: On the role of constitutive autonomy in the reciprocal coupling of perception and action
2015 (English)In: Frontiers in Psychology, ISSN 1664-1078, E-ISSN 1664-1078, Vol. 6, article id 1660Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2015
Keywords
autonomy, autopoiesis, circular causality, cognitive system, constitutive process, development, embodiment, agency, reciprocal coupling
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-11613 (URN)10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01660 (DOI)000364347900001 ()26579043 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84947281347 (Scopus ID)
Projects
SIDUS grant agreement no. 20140220 (AIR, "Action and intention recognition in human interaction with autonomous systems")
Funder
Knowledge Foundation, 20140220
Available from: 2015-10-14 Created: 2015-10-14 Last updated: 2018-08-24Bibliographically approved
Ziemke, T., Thill, S. & Vernon, D. (2015). Embodiment is a Double-Edged Sword in Human-Robot Interaction: Ascribed vs. Intrinsic Intentionality. In: Proc. Workshop on Cognition: A Bridge between Robotics and Interaction. Paper presented at 10th ACM/IEEE Human Robot Interaction Conference (HRI 2015), March 2-5, 2015, Portland, USA (pp. 9-10).
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Embodiment is a Double-Edged Sword in Human-Robot Interaction: Ascribed vs. Intrinsic Intentionality
2015 (English)In: Proc. Workshop on Cognition: A Bridge between Robotics and Interaction, 2015, p. 9-10Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
National Category
Human Computer Interaction
Research subject
Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-11491 (URN)
Conference
10th ACM/IEEE Human Robot Interaction Conference (HRI 2015), March 2-5, 2015, Portland, USA
Available from: 2015-09-06 Created: 2015-09-06 Last updated: 2018-08-01Bibliographically approved
Vernon, D., Beetz, M. & Giulio, S. (2015). Prospection in cognition: The case for joint episodic-procedural memory in cognitive robotics. Frontiers in Robotics and AI, 2, Article ID 19.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Prospection in cognition: The case for joint episodic-procedural memory in cognitive robotics
2015 (English)In: Frontiers in Robotics and AI, ISSN 2296-9144, Vol. 2, article id 19Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2015
National Category
Robotics
Research subject
Technology; Interaction Lab (ILAB)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-11490 (URN)10.3389/frobt.2015.00019 (DOI)000421362200006 ()2-s2.0-84992208832 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-09-06 Created: 2015-09-06 Last updated: 2019-09-10Bibliographically approved
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