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Darcy, L., Björk, M., Knutsson, S., Granlund, M. & Enskär, K. (2016). Following Young Children's Health and Functioning in Everyday Life Through Their Cancer Trajectory. Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, 33(3), 173-189
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Following Young Children's Health and Functioning in Everyday Life Through Their Cancer Trajectory
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1043-4542, E-ISSN 1532-8457, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 173-189Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Knowledge of living with childhood cancer, through the trajectory, is sparse. Aim: The aim of this study was to follow young children's health and functioning in everyday life through their cancer trajectory. Methods: Data were gathered longitudinally from a group of 13 young children and their parents connected to a pediatric oncology unit in Sweden. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth structure was used to identify difficulties in health and functioning in everyday life, in interview and questionnaire data. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed to show patterns of difficulty over a 3-year period from diagnosis. Results: Difficulties experienced by children declined and changed over time. An increase in difficulties with personal interactions with others and access to and support from health care professionals was seen 2 to 3 years after diagnosis and start of treatment. Similar patterns are seen within individual children's trajectories in relation to diagnosis but individual patterns were seen for each child. Conclusions and Clinical Implications: Health care professionals need to plan for ongoing contact with school services and information and support pathways, beyond the treatment period. A person-centered philosophy of care is required throughout the cancer trajectory.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2016
Keywords
young children, cancer, International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health for Children and Youth, ICF-CY, health, everyday life
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14216 (URN)10.1177/1043454215610489 (DOI)000373837100002 ()26655332 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84962691659 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-10-09 Created: 2017-10-09 Last updated: 2018-02-16Bibliographically approved
Björk, M., Sundler, A. J., Hallström, I. & Hammarlund, K. (2016). Like being covered in a wet and dark blanket: Parents' lived experiences of losing a child to cancer. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 25, 40-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Like being covered in a wet and dark blanket: Parents' lived experiences of losing a child to cancer
2016 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 25, p. 40-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of this study was to illuminate parents' lived experiences of losing a child to cancer. Method: Interviews and a narrative about parents' experiences of losing a child to cancer were gathered from six parents of children whom had participated in a longitudinal study across the child's illness trajectory. The analysis of the data was inspired by van Manen's hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Results: One essential theme emerged: Like being covered in a wet and dark blanket, as well as six related themes: Feeling conflicting emotions, Preparing for the moment of death, Continuing parenting after death, Recollecting and sharing memories, Working through the sorrow and New perspectives in life. Conclusion: There is a need for good palliative care. If not, there is a risk that the parent will perseverate and blame themselves for not being a good parent during the suffering child's last time in life. Meetings with the parents six months and two years after the child's death might facilitate healing through the grief process. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Parents, Paediatric cancer, Palliative care, Death, Lived experience, Nursing
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-13269 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2016.08.007 (DOI)000389172500006 ()27865251 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84988644276 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-29 Created: 2016-12-29 Last updated: 2019-11-25Bibliographically approved
Enskär, K., Björk, M., Knutsson, S., Granlund, M., Darcy, L. & Huus, K. (2015). A Swedish perspective on nursing and psychosocial research in paediatric oncology: A literature review. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 19(3), 310-317
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A Swedish perspective on nursing and psychosocial research in paediatric oncology: A literature review
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2015 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 310-317Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: A dramatic improvement in outcomes of survival rates of childhood cancer has been seen. Caring science research is central in providing skills and knowledge to the health care sector, but few overviews of the content of published research have been carried out. The aim of this review was to investigate the content and methodology of published studies in paediatric oncology relevant to caring science, and also to compare possible differences in content and method of the published studies from the nursing and psychosocial perspectives. Method: A systematic literature review was performed of 137 published articles on paediatric oncology relevant to caring science in Sweden. Results: The results show that most of the studies were descriptive or comparative ones with a quantitative design. Most of them focused on parents (43%) or children (28%). Most of the studies investigated wellbeing (88%), using questionnaires (54%) or interviews (38%). Several different measurement instruments had been used. While the results were often clearly presented, the clinical implications were more diffuse. The most acknowledged research fund was the Swedish Childhood Foundation (75%). Conclusions: To reflect the children' perspectives in paediatric oncology require that future researchers take on the challenge of including children (even young ones) in research. The use of a limited number of agreed measurement instruments is desirable. The biggest challenge for the future is to make a shift from explorative to intervention studies. There is an urgent need to transform research results into clinical practice. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Cancer, Caring science, Childhood, Literature review, Nursing, Psychosocial
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-13586 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2014.10.013 (DOI)000357905900015 ()25529934 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84930931401 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-05-23 Created: 2017-05-23 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Larsson, M., Sundler, A. J., Ekebergh, M. & Björk, M. (2015). Altering the Parenting Role: Parents' Experience of Supporting the Health and Well-Being of Their Adolescent Girls. Child and Youth Care Forum, 44(3), 419-432
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Altering the Parenting Role: Parents' Experience of Supporting the Health and Well-Being of Their Adolescent Girls
2015 (English)In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 419-432Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

In research the relationships between parents and their adolescent daughters have been viewed from problem oriented perspectives, usually exploring negative effects and health-related problems. Health and well-being are complex phenomena and knowledge is needed on how parents can support the health and well-being of their daughter.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to illuminate parents’ experiences of supporting the health and well-being of their adolescent girls.

Methods

A descriptive design with a phenomenological approach including interviews, individually or in group with ten mothers and five fathers was conducted.

Results

Supporting the health and well-being of adolescent girls was experienced as challenging. The parents needed to altering the parenting role: from being the one who had previously set the limits they needed to rethink and be available for support. In this process interplay, communication and trust were important to support the health and well-being of the girls in an efficient way. This meaning was further illuminated by four constituents: Balancing the need for control, maintaining a trusting relationship, interplay to facilitate their daughters’ transition to independence, and an ambiguous parenting role.

Conclusions

This study highlights the importance of parents being involved in the everyday life of their adolescent daughter to support her health and well-being. The parents’ ability to contribute to the health and well-being of their girl seemed in this study dependent on their ability to communicate and alter the parenting role with sensitivity to the lifeworld of the adolescent girl.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2015
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing; Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-10340 (URN)10.1007/s10566-014-9287-5 (DOI)000352791800006 ()2-s2.0-84939981631 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-11-25 Created: 2014-12-04 Last updated: 2019-09-25Bibliographically approved
Enskär, K., Huus, K., Björk, M., Granlund, M., Darcy, L. & Knutsson, S. (2015). An Analytic Review of Clinical Implications From Nursing and Psychosocial Research Within Swedish Pediatric Oncology. Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, 30(4), 550-559
Open this publication in new window or tab >>An Analytic Review of Clinical Implications From Nursing and Psychosocial Research Within Swedish Pediatric Oncology
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2015 (English)In: Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families, ISSN 0882-5963, E-ISSN 1532-8449, Vol. 30, no 4, p. 550-559Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The publisher regrets that this article has been temporarily removed. A replacement will appear as soon as possible in which the reason for the removal of the article will be specified, or the article will be reinstated. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Medical sciences; Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-10411 (URN)10.1016/j.pedn.2014.11.001 (DOI)000356182300007 ()25448474 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84930808995 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-12-17 Created: 2014-12-17 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Darcy, L., Enskär, K., Granlund, M., Simeonsson, R. J., Peterson, C. & Björk, M. (2015). Health and functioning in the everyday lives of young children with cancer: documenting with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Children and Youth (ICF-CY). Child Care Health and Development, 41(3), 475-482
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Health and functioning in the everyday lives of young children with cancer: documenting with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Children and Youth (ICF-CY)
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2015 (English)In: Child Care Health and Development, ISSN 0305-1862, E-ISSN 1365-2214, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 475-482Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Health care focus is shifting for children from surviving childhood cancer to living with it on a daily basis. There is a need to document health and function in the everyday lives of young children with cancer using the multidimensional framework and language of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health - Children and Youth (ICF-CY).

AIMS: The aims of this study were (1) to document health and functioning in the everyday lives of young children with cancer using ICF-CY codes and (2) to identify a comprehensive code set that can aid clinical assessment.

METHOD: Interviews with children diagnosed with cancer and their parents, were transcribed, reviewed for content and coded to the ICF-CY using linking procedures.

RESULTS: A comprehensive code set (n = 70) for childhood cancer was identified. The majority of content identified to codes was related to activity and participation describing social relations with family, peers and professionals, preschool attendance and play, as well as issues related to support and independence.

CONCLUSIONS: The ICF-CY can be used to document the nature and range of characteristics and consequences of cancer experienced by children. The identified comprehensive code set could be helpful to health care professionals, parents and teachers in assessing and supporting young children's health and everyday life through the cancer trajectory. The comprehensive code set could be developed as a clinical assessment tool for those caring for young children with cancer. The universal language of the ICF-CY means that the utility of a clinical assessment tool based on identified codes can have wide reaching effects for the care of young children with cancer.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2015
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-10416 (URN)10.1111/cch.12191 (DOI)000352790500016 ()25219405 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84927056502 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-12-17 Created: 2014-12-17 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Larsson, M., Björk, M., Ekebergh, M. & Johansson Sundler, A. (2014). Striving to Make a Positive Difference: School Nurses’ Experiences of Promoting the Health and Well-Being of Adolescent Girls. Journal of School Nursing, 30(5), 358-365
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Striving to Make a Positive Difference: School Nurses’ Experiences of Promoting the Health and Well-Being of Adolescent Girls
2014 (English)In: Journal of School Nursing, ISSN 1059-8405, E-ISSN 1546-8364, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 358-365Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In Sweden, school nurses are part of the School Health Service with the main objective of health promotion to support students’ health and attainment of educational goals. The aim in this phenomenological study was to illuminate the experiences of school nurses in promoting the health and well-being of adolescent girls. Seventeen school nurses were interviewed, both in groups and individually, to facilitate personal disclosure and expressions from their lived experiences. To achieve their goal of improving the health of adolescent girls, school nurses require flexibility in their approach and in endeavoring to make a positive difference they experience many challenges. This study concluded that school nurses can tactfully provide adolescent girls with knowledge and health guidance adjusted to individual needs and empowering the individual girl to participate in her own health process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2014
Keywords
teenage, youth, child, female, women, well-being, nursing
National Category
Health Sciences Nursing
Research subject
Medical sciences; Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-8608 (URN)10.1177/1059840513505223 (DOI)000342234900008 ()24051582 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84907140998 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-10-31 Created: 2013-10-31 Last updated: 2019-09-13Bibliographically approved
Sundler, A. J., Björk, M., Bisholt, B., Ohlsson, U., Kullén Engström, A. & Gustafsson, M. (2014). Student nurses' experiences of the clinical learning environment in relation to the organization of supervision: A questionnaire survey. Nurse Education Today, 34(4), 661-666
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Student nurses' experiences of the clinical learning environment in relation to the organization of supervision: A questionnaire survey
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2014 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 661-666Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aim: The aim was to investigate student nurses' experiences of the clinical learning environment in relation to how the supervision was organized. Background: The clinical environment plays an essential part in student nurses' learning. Even though different models for supervision have been previously set forth, it has been stressed that there is a need both of further empirical studies on the role of preceptorship in undergraduate nursing education and of studies comparing different models. Method: A cross-sectional study with comparative design was carried out with a mixed method approach. Data were collected from student nurses in the final term of the nursing programme at three universities in Sweden by means of a questionnaire. Results: In general the students had positive experiences of the clinical learning environment with respect to pedagogical atmosphere, leadership style of the ward manager, premises of nursing, supervisory relationship, and role of the nurse preceptor and nurse teacher. However, there were significant differences in their ratings of the supervisory relationship (p < 0.001) and the pedagogical atmosphere (p 0.025) depending on how the supervision was organized. Students who had the same preceptor all the time were more satisfied with the supervisory relationship than were those who had different preceptors each day. Students' comments on the supervision confirmed the significance of the preceptor and the supervisory relationship. Conclusion: The organization of the supervision was of significance with regard to the pedagogical atmosphere and the students' relation to preceptors. Students with the same preceptor throughout were more positive concerning the supervisory relationship and the pedagogical atmosphere.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
Keywords
Clinical education, Clinical learning environment, Clinical placement, Preceptors, Questionnaire, Student nurses, Supervision
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-8609 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2013.06.023 (DOI)000333781600031 ()23850574 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84895100809 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-10-31 Created: 2013-10-31 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
Darcy, L., Björk, M., Enskär, K. & Knutsson, S. (2014). The process of striving for an ordinary, everyday life, in young children living with cancer, at six months and one year post diagnosis. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 18(6), 605-612
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The process of striving for an ordinary, everyday life, in young children living with cancer, at six months and one year post diagnosis
2014 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 18, no 6, p. 605-612Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

PURPOSE: Health care focus is shifting from solely looking at surviving cancer to elements of attention relating to living with it on a daily basis.The young child's experiences are crucial to providing evidence based care. The aim of this study was to explore the everyday life of young children as expressed by the child and parents at six months and one year post diagnosis.

METHODS: Interviews were conducted with children and their parents connected to a paediatric oncology unit in Southern Sweden. A qualitative content analysis of interview data from two time points, six months and one year post diagnosis, was carried out.

RESULTS: The process of living with cancer at six months and at one year post diagnosis revealed the child's striving for an ordinary, everyday life. Experiences over time of gaining control, making a normality of the illness and treatment and feeling lonely were described.

CONCLUSION: Nurses have a major role to play in the process of striving for a new normal in the world post-diagnosis, and provide essential roles by giving the young child information, making them participatory in their care and encouraging access to both parents and peers. Understanding this role and addressing these issues regularly can assist the young child in the transition to living with cancer. Longitudinal studies with young children are vital in capturing their experiences through the cancer trajectory and necessary to ensure quality care.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2014
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-10375 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2014.06.006 (DOI)000346222800010 ()24997519 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84912009717 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-12-17 Created: 2014-12-10 Last updated: 2019-08-29Bibliographically approved
Henoch, I., Browall, M., Melin-Johansson, C., Danielson, E., Udo, C., Johansson Sundler, A., . . . Strang, S. (2014). The Swedish version of the Frommelt attitude toward care of the dying scale: Aspects of validity and factors influencing nurses' and nursing students' attitudes. Cancer Nursing, 37(1), E1-E11
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Swedish version of the Frommelt attitude toward care of the dying scale: Aspects of validity and factors influencing nurses' and nursing students' attitudes
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2014 (English)In: Cancer Nursing, ISSN 0162-220X, E-ISSN 1538-9804, Vol. 37, no 1, p. E1-E11Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying persons need to be explored. The Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying (FATCOD) scale has not previously been used in Swedish language. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to compare FATCOD scores among Swedish nurses and nursing students with those from other languages, to explore the existence of 2 subscales, and to evaluate influences of experiences on attitudes toward care of dying patients. METHODS: A descriptive, cross-sectional, and predictive design was used. The FATCOD scores of Swedish nurses from hospice, oncology, surgery clinics, and palliative home care and nursing students were compared with published scores from the United States, Israel, and Japan. Descriptive statistics, t tests, and factor and regression analyses were used. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 213 persons: 71 registered nurses, 42 enrolled nurses, and 100 nursing students. Swedish FATCOD mean scores did not differ from published means from the United States and Israel, but were significantly more positive than Japanese means. In line with Japanese studies, factor analyses yielded a 2-factor solution. Total FATCOD and subscales had low Cronbach α's. Hospice and palliative team nurses were more positive than oncology and surgery nurses to care for dying patients. CONCLUSIONS: Although our results suggest that the Swedish FATCOD may comprise 2 distinct scales, the total scale may be the most adequate and applicable for use in Sweden. Professional experience was associated with nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying patients. IMPLICATION FOR PRACTICE: Care culture might influence nurses' attitudes toward caring for dying patients; the benefits of education need to be explored.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2014
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-8405 (URN)10.1097/NCC.0b013e318279106b (DOI)000328936200001 ()23357885 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84890555647 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-08-14 Created: 2013-08-14 Last updated: 2017-12-06Bibliographically approved
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Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0001-6419-2417

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