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Sundler, Annelie JohanssonORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9194-3244
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Publications (10 of 32) Show all publications
Thorstensson, S., Blomgren, C., Sundler, A. J. & Larsson, M. (2018). To break the weight gain: A qualitative study on the experience of school nurses working with overweight children in elementary school. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 27(1-2), e251-e258
Open this publication in new window or tab >>To break the weight gain: A qualitative study on the experience of school nurses working with overweight children in elementary school
2018 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 1-2, p. e251-e258Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectives: To describe the experiences of school nurses working with overweight schoolchildren. 

Background: School nurses play an important role in health promotion of overweight children. Lifestyle changes and interventions to address being overweight can improve health outcomes and decrease the risk for future health problems. 

Design: A descriptive and qualitative design with a phenomenological approach was used. Data were gathered through interviews with school nurses working with overweight schoolchildren in Swedish elementary school; the data were subsequently analysed for meanings. 

Results:Working with overweight children was perceived as demanding and challenging by the school nurses who found conversations on this topic emotionally loaded and complex. In addition, the school nurses needed to be sensitive and supportive to succeed in their support for a healthier everyday life for the schoolchildren. It was stated as important to find ways to break the child ’s weight gain and to cooperate with the parents in this work. The children ’s decrease in weight was experienced to be more successful when making small, step-by-step changes together with the child and his or her parents.

Conclusions: This study concludes that health talks about being overweight may be a challenge for school nurses. Strategies used to manage and succeed in this work included engaging in motivational conversations, working step by step and cooperating with the child’s parents. Furthermore, the nurses experienced that they needed to provide emotional support for overweight children during school time. 

Relevance to clinical practice: The school nurses’ health promotion needs to focus on how to break weight gain in overweight children. In this work, the nurses’ sensitiveness seems pivotal. Further research is needed on school nurses’ work with health promotion and support of overweight children concerning how to perform efficient communication and cooperation with the children and their parents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Inc., 2018
Keywords
children, health promotion, nursing, obesity, pupils, qualitative
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14559 (URN)10.1111/jocn.13924 (DOI)000418871000051 ()28618072 (PubMedID)
Available from: 2017-12-06 Created: 2017-12-06 Last updated: 2018-02-16Bibliographically approved
Björk, M., Sundler, A. J., Hallström, I. & Hammarlund, K. (2016). Like being covered in a wet and dark blanket: Parents' lived experiences of losing a child to cancer. European Journal of Oncology Nursing, 25, 40-45
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Like being covered in a wet and dark blanket: Parents' lived experiences of losing a child to cancer
2016 (English)In: European Journal of Oncology Nursing, ISSN 1462-3889, E-ISSN 1532-2122, Vol. 25, p. 40-45Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Purpose: The aim of this study was to illuminate parents' lived experiences of losing a child to cancer. Method: Interviews and a narrative about parents' experiences of losing a child to cancer were gathered from six parents of children whom had participated in a longitudinal study across the child's illness trajectory. The analysis of the data was inspired by van Manen's hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Results: One essential theme emerged: Like being covered in a wet and dark blanket, as well as six related themes: Feeling conflicting emotions, Preparing for the moment of death, Continuing parenting after death, Recollecting and sharing memories, Working through the sorrow and New perspectives in life. Conclusion: There is a need for good palliative care. If not, there is a risk that the parent will perseverate and blame themselves for not being a good parent during the suffering child's last time in life. Meetings with the parents six months and two years after the child's death might facilitate healing through the grief process. 

Keywords
Parents, Paediatric cancer, Palliative care, Death, Lived experience, Nursing
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-13269 (URN)10.1016/j.ejon.2016.08.007 (DOI)000389172500006 ()27865251 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84988644276 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-29 Created: 2016-12-29 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Blomberg, K., Isaksson, A.-K., Allvin, R., Bisholt, B., Ewertsson, M., Kullén Engström, A., . . . Gustafsson, M. (2016). Work stress among newly graduated nurses in relation to workplace and clinical group supervision. Journal of Nursing Management, 24(1), 80-87
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Work stress among newly graduated nurses in relation to workplace and clinical group supervision
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Nursing Management, ISSN 0966-0429, E-ISSN 1365-2834, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 80-87Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2016
Keywords
clinicalgroup supervision, newly graduated nurses, occupational stress, workplace
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-10758 (URN)10.1111/jonm.12274 (DOI)000368263600021 ()25421164 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84956505898 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-03-18 Created: 2015-03-18 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Hafskjold, L., Sundler, A. J., Holmström, I. K., Sundling, V., van Dulmen, S. & Eide, H. (2015). A cross-sectional study on person-centred communication in the care of older people: The COMHOME study protocol. BMJ Open, 5(4), Article ID e007864.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>A cross-sectional study on person-centred communication in the care of older people: The COMHOME study protocol
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2015 (English)In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 5, no 4, article id e007864Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Introduction: This paper presents an international cross-sectional study on person-centred communication with older people receiving healthcare (COMHOME). Person-centred care relies on effective communication, but few studies have explored this with a specific focus on older people. The main aim of the COMHOME study is to generate knowledge on person-centred communication with older people (>65 years) in home healthcare services, radiographic and optometric practice. Methods and analysis: This study will explore the communication between care providers and older persons in home care services. Home healthcare visits will be audiorecorded (n=500) in Norway, the Netherlands and Sweden. Analyses will be performed with the Verona Coding Definitions for Emotional Sequences (VR-CoDES), the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS) and qualitative methods. The content of the communication, communicative challenging situations as well as empathy, power distance, decision-making, preservation of dignity and respect will be explored. In Norway, an additional 100 encounters, 50 in optometric practice (video recorded) and 50 in radiographic practice (audiorecorded), will be analysed. Furthermore, healthcare providers' self-reported communication skills, empathy, mindfulness and emotional intelligence in relation to observed person-centred communication skills will be assessed using well-established standardised instruments. Ethics and dissemination: Depending on national legislation, approval of either the central ethical committees (eg, nation or university), the national data protection officials or the local ethical committees (eg, units of home healthcare) was obtained. Study findings will be disseminated widely through peer-reviewed publications and conference presentations. The research findings will add knowledge to improve services provided to this vulnerable group of patients. Additionally, the findings will underpin a training programme for healthcare students and care providers focusing on communication with older people. © 2015, BMJ Publishing Group. All rights reserved

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BMJ Publishing Group, 2015
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-10839 (URN)10.1136/bmjopen-2015-007864 (DOI)000354705000127 ()25877282 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84929157536 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-04-15 Created: 2015-04-15 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Larsson, M., Sundler, A. J., Ekebergh, M. & Björk, M. (2015). Altering the Parenting Role: Parents' Experience of Supporting the Health and Well-Being of Their Adolescent Girls. Child and Youth Care Forum, 44(3), 419-432
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Altering the Parenting Role: Parents' Experience of Supporting the Health and Well-Being of Their Adolescent Girls
2015 (English)In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 419-432Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

In research the relationships between parents and their adolescent daughters have been viewed from problem oriented perspectives, usually exploring negative effects and health-related problems. Health and well-being are complex phenomena and knowledge is needed on how parents can support the health and well-being of their daughter.

Objectives

The aim of this study was to illuminate parents’ experiences of supporting the health and well-being of their adolescent girls.

Methods

A descriptive design with a phenomenological approach including interviews, individually or in group with ten mothers and five fathers was conducted.

Results

Supporting the health and well-being of adolescent girls was experienced as challenging. The parents needed to altering the parenting role: from being the one who had previously set the limits they needed to rethink and be available for support. In this process interplay, communication and trust were important to support the health and well-being of the girls in an efficient way. This meaning was further illuminated by four constituents: Balancing the need for control, maintaining a trusting relationship, interplay to facilitate their daughters’ transition to independence, and an ambiguous parenting role.

Conclusions

This study highlights the importance of parents being involved in the everyday life of their adolescent daughter to support her health and well-being. The parents’ ability to contribute to the health and well-being of their girl seemed in this study dependent on their ability to communicate and alter the parenting role with sensitivity to the lifeworld of the adolescent girl.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2015
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-10340 (URN)10.1007/s10566-014-9287-5 (DOI)000352791800006 ()2-s2.0-84910070598 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-11-25 Created: 2014-12-04 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Svanström, R. & Sundler, A. J. (2015). Gradually losing one’s foothold – a fragmented existence when living alone with dementia. Dementia, 14(2), 145-163
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Gradually losing one’s foothold – a fragmented existence when living alone with dementia
2015 (English)In: Dementia, ISSN 1471-3012, E-ISSN 1741-2684, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 145-163Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The number of persons with dementia who lives at home for a longer period of time after diagnosis is increasing. Even if the literature in the dementia field is growing, there is a need for more knowledge about everyday life of persons with a dementia disease; particularly the lived perspective of persons who live alone. The aim of this study was to elucidate the phenomenon of living alone with dementia and having a manifest care need. This phenomenological study was carried out from a reflective lifeworld approach. The data material in the study consisted of field notes from 32 visits and transcriptions from 11 tape-recorded conversations with six participants. The results reveal that the person with dementia who lives alone ends up in a vague existence where they cannot survive alone. The person’s level of activity comes to a halt and body movement becomes slower. Daily life becomes more difficult to manage and the person’s earlier natural way of relating to the world and the people around them is gradually lost. This is followed by a loneliness and forgetfulness that cloud the meaning of life. This study highlights the importance of the patient’s perspective needed to better understand the inner life of a person who suffers from dementia. This understanding is important in the organization of help and care as well as for caregivers to better understand these individuals and their needs.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Sage Publications, 2015
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-8615 (URN)10.1177/1471301213494510 (DOI)000351709500001 ()24339094 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84925234307 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2013-11-04 Created: 2013-11-04 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Gustafsson, M., Kullén Engström, A., Ohlsson, U., Sundler, A. J. & Bisholt, B. (2015). Nurse teacher models in clinical education from the perspective of student nurses: A mixed method study. Nurse Education Today, 35(12), 1289-1294
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurse teacher models in clinical education from the perspective of student nurses: A mixed method study
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2015 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 1289-1294Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES:

The aim was to describe and compare the clinical teacher's role in different models of clinical practice from the perspective of student nurses.

DESIGN AND SETTINGS:

The study took place in collaboration with two Swedish universities that applied different educational models in clinical practice. A mixed method approach was used. The quantitative part had a comparative design and the qualitative part had a descriptive design.

PARTICIPANTS:

The study group consisted of 114 student nurses (response rate 87%). Fifty-three of them had met clinical teachers employed at the university and not participating in the daily clinical work (University Nurse Teachers, UNTs), whilst 61 had met clinical teachers dividing their time between teaching and nursing (Clinical Nurse Teachers, CNTs). Eight students participated in the qualitative part of the study.

METHODS:

A questionnaire including the CLES+T scale was used to ascertain the students' perception of the clinical teacher's role, complemented by interviews directed towards an enrichment of this perception.

RESULTS:

Students meeting CNTs agreed more strongly than those meeting UNTs that the teacher had the ability to help them integrate theory and practice. Whilst spontaneous meetings between students and CNTs occurred, students mostly met UNTs in seminars. Students meeting UNTs felt alone but did appreciate having someone outside the clinical environment to provide support if they did not get along with their preceptor.

CONCLUSIONS:

In the case of UNTs, it is important that they keep their knowledge of clinical issues updated and visit the clinical placement not only for seminars but also to give students emotional support. In the case of CNTs, it is important that they are members of the faculty at the university, take part in the planning of the clinical courses and are able to explain the learning goals to the students.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Clinical education, Mixed methods, Nurse teacher, Nursing education, Student nurse, Triangulation
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-10835 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2015.03.008 (DOI)000365372700025 ()25846197 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84946490890 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-04-15 Created: 2015-04-15 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Westin, L., Sundler, A. J. & Berglund, M. (2015). Students' experiences of learning in relation to didactic strategies during the first year of a nursing programme: a qualitative study. BMC Medical Education, 15, Article ID 49.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Students' experiences of learning in relation to didactic strategies during the first year of a nursing programme: a qualitative study
2015 (English)In: BMC Medical Education, ISSN 1472-6920, E-ISSN 1472-6920, Vol. 15, article id 49Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In university undergraduate nursing programmes, didactic strategies that enable students to learn nursing skills, solve problems and develop reflective and critical thinking and practice are needed. The aim of this study was to explore how different didactic strategies support nursing students’ experiences of learning during the first year of a reconstructed nursing curriculum.

Methods

This study employed a qualitative approach. The data were gathered through written narratives that were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

Results

Nursing students’ experiences of learning through different didactic strategies, were evident in the text. These perspectives were organised into the following themes: To focus on the patient perspective and paying more attention to others, Learning from discussions and reflections on one’s own learning, Training for the professional role and becoming more courage, and Gaining insights into nursing and increasing one’s self-awareness. The education increased the students’ self-awareness, which helped them to pay greater attention to patients and their relative. During the learning process, the students became more courageous, reflected and discovered their shortcomings.

Conclusion

Stated didactic strategies supported a broad base of knowledge on nursing and the professional role of nurses. Educators are challenged to strengthen meaningful learning in nursing and to facilitate the progression of nursing programmes.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2015
Keywords
Nursing, Education, Teaching, Qualitative, Learning strategies
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-10817 (URN)10.1186/s12909-015-0338-x (DOI)000351580000001 ()25889028 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84961292156 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-03-31 Created: 2015-03-31 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Sundler, A. J., Pettersson, A. & Berglund, M. (2015). Undergraduate nursing students' experiences when examining nursing skills in clinical simulation laboratories with high-fidelity patient simulators: A phenomenological research study. Nurse Education Today, 35(12), 1257-1261
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Undergraduate nursing students' experiences when examining nursing skills in clinical simulation laboratories with high-fidelity patient simulators: A phenomenological research study
2015 (English)In: Nurse Education Today, ISSN 0260-6917, E-ISSN 1532-2793, Vol. 35, no 12, p. 1257-1261Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Simulation has become a widely used and established pedagogy for teaching clinical nursing skills. Nevertheless, the evidence in favour of this pedagogical approach is weak, and more knowledge is needed in support of its use. The aim of this study was (a) to explore the experiences of undergraduate nursing students when examining knowledge, skills and competences in clinical simulation laboratories with high-fidelity patient simulators and (b) to analyse these students' learning experiences during the examination. A phenomenological approach was used, and qualitative interviews were conducted among 23 second-year undergraduate nursing students-17 women and 6 men. The findings revealed that, irrespective of whether they passed or failed the examination, it was experienced as a valuable assessment of the students' knowledge and skills. Even if the students felt that the examination was challenging, they described it as a learning opportunity. In the examination, the students were able to integrate theory with practice, and earlier established knowledge was scrutinised when reflecting on the scenarios. The examination added aspects to the students' learning that prepared them for the real world of nursing in a safe environment without risking patient safety. The study findings suggest that examinations in clinical simulation laboratories can be a useful teaching strategy in nursing education. The use of high-fidelity patient simulators made the examination authentic. The reflections and feedback on the scenario were described as significant for the students' learning. Undergraduate nursing students can improve their knowledge, understanding, competence and skills when such examinations are performed in the manner used in this study.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Education, Learning, Nursing, Simulation
National Category
Nursing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-11020 (URN)10.1016/j.nedt.2015.04.008 (DOI)000365372700020 ()25943280 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84946495420 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-06-09 Created: 2015-06-09 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Hammarlund, K., Andersson, E., Tenenbaum, H. & Sundler, A. J. (2015). We are also interested in how fathers feel: a qualitative exploration of child health center nurses' recognition of postnatal depression in fathers. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 15, Article ID 290.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>We are also interested in how fathers feel: a qualitative exploration of child health center nurses' recognition of postnatal depression in fathers
2015 (English)In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 15, article id 290Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: To become a parent is an emotionally life-changing experience. Paternal depression during the postnatal period has been associated with emotional and behavioral problems in children. The condition has predominantly been related to mothers, and the recognition of paternal postnatal depression (PND) has been paid less attention to. PND in fathers may be difficult to detect. However, nurses in pediatric services meet a lot of fathers and are in a position to detect a father who is suffering from PND. Therefore, the aim of this study was (a) to explore Child Health Center nurses' experiences of observing depression in fathers during the postnatal period; and (b) to explore hindrances of observing these fathers.

METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted. Ten nurses were interviewed in 2014. A thematic data analysis was performed and data were analyzed for meaning.

RESULTS: Paternal PND was experienced as being vague and difficult to detect. Experiences of fathers with such problems were limited, and it was hard to grasp the health status of the fathers, something which was further complicated when routines were lacking or when gender attitudes influenced the daily work of the nurses.

CONCLUSION: This study contributes to an increased awareness of hindrances to the recognition of PND in fathers. The importance to detect all signals of paternal health status in fathers suffering from PND needs to be acknowledged. Overall, more attention needs to be paid to PND in fathers where a part of the solution for this is that they are screened just like the mothers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2015
Keywords
Father, Interview, Depression, Nursing, Qualitative
National Category
Health Sciences Nursing Applied Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-11850 (URN)10.1186/s12884-015-0726-6 (DOI)000364548300001 ()26552601 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84947037853 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-01-25 Created: 2016-01-25 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-9194-3244

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