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Mårtensson, Lena B.ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0079-3966
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Publications (10 of 54) Show all publications
Vixner, L., Schytt, E. & Mårtensson, L. B. (2017). Associations between maternal characteristics and women's responses to acupuncture during labour: a secondary analysis from a randomised controlled trial. Acupuncture in Medicine, 35(3), 180-188
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Associations between maternal characteristics and women's responses to acupuncture during labour: a secondary analysis from a randomised controlled trial
2017 (English)In: Acupuncture in Medicine, ISSN 0964-5284, E-ISSN 1759-9873, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 180-188Article in journal (Refereed) Published
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-13253 (URN)10.1136/acupmed-2016-011164 (DOI)000407905400003 ()2-s2.0-85007227233 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2016-12-21 Created: 2016-12-21 Last updated: 2017-11-27
Bäckström, C., Larsson, T., Wahlgren, E., Golsäter, M., Mårtensson, L. B. & Thorstensson, S. (2017). ‘It makes you feel like you are not alone’: Expectant first-time mothers’ experiences of social support within the social network, when preparing for childbirth and parenting. Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, 12, 51-57
Open this publication in new window or tab >>‘It makes you feel like you are not alone’: Expectant first-time mothers’ experiences of social support within the social network, when preparing for childbirth and parenting
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2017 (English)In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 12, p. 51-57Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
Social support, Pregnancy, Women, Mother, Expectant, First-time, Content analysis
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-13513 (URN)10.1016/j.srhc.2017.02.007 (DOI)000401884100009 ()28477932 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85014870424 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-04-20 Created: 2017-04-20 Last updated: 2018-04-03Bibliographically approved
Kenne Sarenmalm, E., Mårtensson, L. B., Andersson, B. A., Karlsson, P. & Bergh, I. (2017). Mindfulness and its efficacy for psychological and biological responses in women with breast cancer. Cancer Medicine, 6(5), 1108-1122
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mindfulness and its efficacy for psychological and biological responses in women with breast cancer
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2017 (English)In: Cancer Medicine, ISSN 2045-7634, E-ISSN 2045-7634, Vol. 6, no 5, p. 1108-1122Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Many breast cancer survivors have to deal with a variety of psychological andphysiological sequelae including impaired immune responses. The primary purposeof this randomized controlled trial was to determine the efficacy of amindfulness-basedstress reduction (MBSR) intervention for mood disorders inwomen with breast cancer. Secondary outcomes were symptom experience, healthstatus, coping capacity, mindfulness, posttraumatic growth, and immune status.This RTC assigned 166 women with breast cancer to one of three groups: MBSR(8 weekly group sessions of MBSR), active controls (self-instructingMBSR) andnon-MBSR.The primary outcome measure was the Hospital Anxiety and DepressionScale. Secondary outcome measures were: Memorial Symptom AssessmentScale, SF-36,Sense of Coherence, Five Facets of Mindfulness Questionnaire,and Posttraumatic Growth Index. Blood samples were analyzed using flow cytometryfor NK-cellactivity (FANKIA) and lymphocyte phenotyping; concentrationsof cytokines were determined in sera using commercial high sensitivityIL-6and IL-8ELISA (enzyme-linkedimmunosorbent assay) kits. Results provideevidence for beneficial effects of MBSR on psychological and biological responses.Women in the MBSR group experienced significant improvements in depressionscores, with a mean pre-MBSRHAD-scoreof 4.3 and post-MBSRscore of 3.3(P = 0.001), and compared to non-MBSR(P = 0.015). Significant improvementson scores for distress, symptom burden, and mental health were also observed.Furthermore, MBSR facilitated coping capacity as well as mindfulness and posttraumaticgrowth. Significant benefits in immune response within the MBSRgroup and between groups were observed. MBSR have potential for alleviatingdepression, symptom experience, and for enhancing coping capacity, mindfulnessand posttraumatic growth, which may improve breast cancer survivorship.MBSR also led to beneficial effect on immune function; the clinical implicationsof this finding merit further research.

Keywords
Breast cancer, immune response, mindfulness-based stress reduction, randomized clinical trial
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-13514 (URN)10.1002/cam4.1052 (DOI)000401330300023 ()28421677 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85018595351 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-04-20 Created: 2017-04-20 Last updated: 2017-11-29
Mårtensson, L. B., Hutton, E. K., Lee, N., Kildea, S., Gao, Y. & Bergh, I. (2017). Sterile water injections for childbirth pain: An evidenced based guide to practice. Women and Birth
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Sterile water injections for childbirth pain: An evidenced based guide to practice
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2017 (English)In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: About 30% of women in labour suffer from lower back pain. Studies of sterile water injectionsfor management of low back pain have consistently shown this approach to be effective. The objective ofthis evidence-based guide is to facilitate the clinical use of sterile water injections to relieve lower backpain in labouring women.Methods: To identify relevant publications our search strategy was based on computerised literaturesearches in scientific databases. The methodological quality of each study was assessed using themodified version of the Jadad scale, 12 studies were included.Findings: Recommendations regarding the clinical use of sterile water injections for pain relief in labourare reported in terms of the location of injection administration, various injection techniques, number ofinjections used, amount of sterile water in each injection and adverse effects.Discussion: Both injection techniques provide good pain relief for lower back pain during labour. Thesubcutaneous injection technique is possibly less painful than the intracutaneous techniqueadministered, but we are unsure if this impacts on effectiveness. The effect seems to be related tothe number of injections and the amount of sterile water in each injection.Conclusion: The recommendation at present, based on the current state of knowledge, is to give fourinjections. Notwithstanding the differences in injection technique and number of injections the methodappears to provide significant levels of pain relief and can be repeated as often as required with noadverse effect (apart from the administration pain) on the woman or her foetus.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2017
Keywords
sterile water injections, childbirth, low back pain, pain relief, guidelines
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-14619 (URN)10.1016/j.wombi.2017.12.001 (DOI)
Available from: 2018-01-05 Created: 2018-01-05 Last updated: 2018-01-10Bibliographically approved
Bäckström, C., Thorstensson, S., Mårtensson, L. B., Grimming, R., Nyblin, Y. & Golsäter, M. (2017). 'To be able to support her, I must feel calm and safe': pregnant women's partners perceptions of professional support during pregnancy. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 17, 1-11, Article ID 234.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>'To be able to support her, I must feel calm and safe': pregnant women's partners perceptions of professional support during pregnancy
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2017 (English)In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 17, p. 1-11, article id 234Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Professional support does not always meet the needs of expectant fathers or co-mothers. The way in which professional support is offered during pregnancy varies internationally, depending on the country. In order to attain a greater understanding of partners' experiences of professional support, it is necessary to further illuminate their perceptions of it. The aim of this study was therefore to explore pregnant women's partners' perceptions of professional support during pregnancy. Methods: Qualitative research design. Partners of pregnant women were interviewed during gestational week 36-38. Individual semi-structured interviews were used to explore the partners' perceptions. The data was analysed using a phenomenographic approach. The study was performed in a county in south-western Sweden; the data collection was conducted from November 2014 to February 2015. Fourteen partners (expectant fathers and co-mothers) of women who were expectant first-time mothers with singleton pregnancies, were interviewed. Results: The findings of the study are presented through four descriptive categories: Ability to absorb adequate information; Possibility to meet and share with other expectant parents; Confirmation of the partner's importance; and Influence on the couple relationship. Using a theoretical assumption of the relationship between the categories showed that the fourth category was influenced by the other three categories. Conclusions: The partners perceived that professional support during pregnancy could influence the couple relationship. The partners' ability to communicate and to experience togetherness with the women increased when the expectant couple received professional support together. The support created also possibilities to meet and share experiences with other expectant parents. In contrast, a lack of support was found to contribute to partners' feelings of unimportance. It was essential that the midwives included the partners by confirming that they were individuals who had different needs for various types of professional support. The partners perceived it easier to absorb information when it was adequate and given with a pedagogic that made the partners become interested and emotionally engaged.

National Category
Health Sciences Other Medical Sciences
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam)
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-13972 (URN)10.1186/s12884-017-1411-8 (DOI)000405739400003 ()28716133 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85024102911 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-08-10 Created: 2017-08-10 Last updated: 2018-04-03Bibliographically approved
Bäckström, C. A., Mårtensson, L. B., Golsäter, M. H. & Thorstensson, S. A. (2016). "It's like a puzzle": Pregnant women's perceptions of professional support in midwifery care. Women and Birth, 29(6), e110-e118
Open this publication in new window or tab >>"It's like a puzzle": Pregnant women's perceptions of professional support in midwifery care
2016 (English)In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 29, no 6, p. e110-e118Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ProblemPregnant women are not always satisfied with the professional support they receive during their midwifery care. More knowledge is needed to understand what professional support pregnant women need for childbirth and parenting.

BackgroundChildbearing and the transition to becoming a parent is a sensitive period in one's life during which one should have the opportunity to receive professional support. Professional support does not always correspond to pregnant women's needs. To understand pregnant women's needs for professional support within midwifery care, it is crucial to further illuminate women's experiences of this support.

AimTo explore pregnant women's perceptions of professional support in midwifery care.

MethodsA qualitative study using semi-structured interviews. Fifteen women were interviewed during gestational weeks 36–38. Data was analysed using phenomenography.

FindingsThe women perceived professional support in midwifery care to be reassuring and emotional, to consist of reliable information, and to be mediated with pedagogical creativity. The professional support facilitated new social contacts, partner involvement and contributed to mental preparedness. The findings of the study were presented in six categories and the category Professional support contributes to mental preparedness was influenced by the five other categories.

ConclusionPregnant women prepare for childbirth and parenting by using several different types of professional support in midwifery care: a strategy that could be described as piecing together a puzzle. When the women put the puzzle together, each type of professional support works as a valuable piece in the whole puzzle. Through this, professional support could contribute to women's mental preparedness for childbirth and parenting.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2016
Keywords
Professional support, Midwife, Pregnant, Women, Childbirth
National Category
Nursing Other Health Sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-12266 (URN)10.1016/j.wombi.2016.04.011 (DOI)000393092900003 ()27199171 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84967104270 (Scopus ID)
Projects
Föräldrastödstudien
Available from: 2016-05-19 Created: 2016-05-19 Last updated: 2018-04-03Bibliographically approved
Ekström, A. C., Nilsson, L., Apell, C., Palmius, D. & Mårtensson, L. B. (2016). Nurses challenges to support hospitalized patients regarding sexual-health issues. Journal of Nursing & Care, 5(3), Article ID 1000344.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Nurses challenges to support hospitalized patients regarding sexual-health issues
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2016 (English)In: Journal of Nursing & Care, ISSN 2167-1168, Vol. 5, no 3, article id 1000344Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The approach to nursing should be characterized by a holistic view of the human being which includes sexual health. From a nursing perspective, it is therefore of most importance to have a dialogue about factors associated with sexual health also among hospitalized patients. However, to our knowledge there is a lack of qualitative studies regarding nurses attitudes about dialogue with patients about sexual health.

Objective: To investigate nurses attitudes towards dialogue with hospitalized patients about sexual health.

Methods: A qualitative method was used and interviews were conducted which then were analyzed using a qualitative content analysis. Eleven registered nurses were included, the inclusion criteria was: at least one year of experience as a nurse and working on a medical or surgical ward in a hospital in the southwest of Sweden. The participants were in the ages 25-65 and had worked as nurses between 2 and 30 years. Nine of the participants were women. The data were collected during 2011.

Results: The nurses experiences of and reflections on dialogue with patients about sexual health were presented as a single main theme: Nurses challenges to support hospitalized patients with sexual health issues. This theme had three categories: Feeling uncomfortable, Feeling inadequate and Task-oriented care with related subcategories respectively.

Conclusions: Nurses attitudes towards their dialogues about sexual health with hospitalized patients were less challenging if they were initiated by the patients or if the patients were men with medical causes related to sexual health. Lack of knowledge and support from colleagues became reasons why nurses felt inadequate about discussing sexual health with their patients.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OMICS Publishing Group, 2016
Keywords
Sexual health, Nursing care, Qualitative analysis, Dialogue
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-12529 (URN)10.4172/2167-1168.1000344 (DOI)
Available from: 2016-06-20 Created: 2016-06-20 Last updated: 2017-11-28Bibliographically approved
Vixner, L., Mårtensson, L. & Schytt, E. (2015). Acupuncture with manual and electrical stimulation for labour pain: a two month follow up of recollection of pain and birth experience. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 15(1), Article ID 180.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acupuncture with manual and electrical stimulation for labour pain: a two month follow up of recollection of pain and birth experience
2015 (English)In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1472-6882, E-ISSN 1472-6882, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 180Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2015
Keywords
analgesic agent, morphine, nitrous oxide, sterile water
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-11311 (URN)10.1186/s12906-015-0708-2 (DOI)000357254700001 ()26066641 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84938749240 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2015-07-28 Created: 2015-07-28 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved
Bergh, I. H. E., Johansson, A., Bratt, A., Ekström, A. & Mårtensson, L. B. (2015). Assessment and documentation of women's labour pain: A cross-sectional study in Swedish delivery wards. Women and Birth, 28(2), E14-E18
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Assessment and documentation of women's labour pain: A cross-sectional study in Swedish delivery wards
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2015 (English)In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 28, no 2, p. E14-E18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: A woman's pain during labour plays a dominant role in childbirth. The midwife's role is to assess the degree of pain experienced during labour. When professionals respond to labour pain with acknowledgement and understanding, the woman's sense of control and empowerment is increased, which could contribute to a positive experience of childbirth. The aim of this study is to describe how labour pain in Swedish delivery wards is assessed and documented. Methods: This quantitative descriptive study was designed as a national survey performed through telephone interviews with the representatives of 34 delivery wards in Sweden. Results and conclusion: The majority of the participating delivery wards assessed and documented women's labour pain, but in an unstructured manner. The wards differed in how the assessments and documentation were performed. In addition, almost all the delivery wards that participated in the survey lacked guidelines for the assessment and documentation of the degree of pain during labour. The findings also showed that the issue of labour pain was sometimes discussed in the delivery wards, but not in a structured or consistent way. (C) 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Australia (a division of Reed International Books Australia Pty Ltd). All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015
Keywords
Pain assessment, Childbirth, Documentation, Midwifery, Visual analogue scale
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine Nursing
Research subject
Woman, Child and Family (WomFam); Age and Ageing
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-13587 (URN)10.1016/j.wombi.2015.01.010 (DOI)000358011700003 ()25686875 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84937523315 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2017-05-23 Created: 2017-05-23 Last updated: 2017-11-27Bibliographically approved
Vixner, L., Schytt, E., Stener-Victorin, E., Waldenström, U., Pettersson, H. & Mårtensson, L. B. (2014). Acupuncture with manual and electrical stimulation for labour pain: a longitudinal randomised controlled trial. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, 14, Article ID 187.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Acupuncture with manual and electrical stimulation for labour pain: a longitudinal randomised controlled trial
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2014 (English)In: BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, ISSN 1472-6882, E-ISSN 1472-6882, Vol. 14, article id 187Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Acupuncture is commonly used to reduce pain during labour despite contradictory results. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of acupuncture with manual stimulation and acupuncture with combined manual and electrical stimulation (electro-acupuncture) compared with standard care in reducing labour pain. Our hypothesis was that both acupuncture stimulation techniques were more effective than standard care, and that electro-acupuncture was most effective.

Methods: A longitudinal randomised controlled trial. The recruitment of participants took place at the admission to the labour ward between November 2008 and October 2011 at two Swedish hospitals . 303 nulliparous women with normal pregnancies were randomised to: 40 minutes of manual acupuncture (MA), electro-acupuncture (EA), or standard care without acupuncture (SC). Primary outcome: labour pain, assessed by Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Secondary outcomes: relaxation, use of obstetric pain relief during labour and post-partum assessments of labour pain. The sample size calculation was based on the primary outcome and a difference of 15 mm on VAS was regarded as clinically relevant, this gave 101 in each group, including a total of 303 women.

Results: Mean estimated pain scores on VAS (SC: 69.0, MA: 66.4 and EA: 68.5), adjusted for: treatment, age, education, and time from baseline, with no interactions did not differ between the groups (SC vs MA: mean difference 2.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] -1.7-6.9 and SC vs EA: mean difference 0.6 [95% CI] -3.6-4.8). Fewer number of women in the EA group used epidural analgesia (46%) than women in the MA group (61%) and SC group (70%) (EA vs SC: odds ratio [OR] 0.35; [95% CI] 0.19-0.67).

Conclusions: Acupuncture does not reduce women’s experience of labour pain, neither with manual stimulation nor with combined manual and electrical stimulation. However, fewer women in the EA group used epidural analgesia thus indicating that the effect of acupuncture with electrical stimulation may be underestimated.

These findings were obtained in a context with free access to other forms of pain relief.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
BioMed Central, 2014
Keywords
acupuncture; childbirth; pain; complementary methods
National Category
Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Medicine
Research subject
Medical sciences
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-10104 (URN)10.1186/1472-6882-14-187 (DOI)000337323400001 ()24913704 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-84902551771 (Scopus ID)
Available from: 2014-10-19 Created: 2014-10-19 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved
Organisations
Identifiers
ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-0079-3966

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