his.sePublikationer
Ändra sökning
Länk till posten
Permanent länk

Direktlänk
BETA
Publikationer (10 of 86) Visa alla publikationer
Salminen-Vaparanta, N., Koivisto, M., Vorobyev, V., Alakurtti, K. & Revonsuo, A. (2019). Does TMS on V3 block conscious visual perception?. Neuropsychologia, 128, 223-231
Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Does TMS on V3 block conscious visual perception?
Visa övriga...
2019 (Engelska)Ingår i: Neuropsychologia, ISSN 0028-3932, E-ISSN 1873-3514, ISSN 000493910900026, Vol. 128, s. 223-231Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
Abstract [en]

Primary visual cortex (V1) and extrastriate V2 are necessary for the emergence of visual consciousness, but the effects of involvement of extrastriate V3 on visual consciousness is unclear. The objective of this study was to examine the causal role of V3 in visual consciousness in humans. We combined neuronavigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with a computational model of the TMS-induced electric field to test whether or not the intact processing of visual input in V3, like in V1 and V2, is necessary for conscious visual perception. We targeted the stimulation both to V2 and to V3. If TMS of V3 blocks conscious visual perception of stimuli, then activation in V3 is a causally necessary prerequisite for conscious perception of stimuli. According to the alternative hypothesis, TMS of V3 will not block the conscious visual perception of stimuli, because the pathways from V1 to the higher cortical areas that go around V3 provide sufficient visual input for the emergence of conscious visual perception. The results showed that TMS interfered with conscious perception of features, detection of stimulus presence and the ability to discriminate the letter stimuli both when TMS was targeted either to V3 or to V2. For the conscious detection of stimulus presence, the effect was significantly stronger when V2 was stimulated than when V3 was stimulated. The results of the present study suggest that in addition to the primary visual cortex and V2, also V3 causally contributes to the generation of the most basic form of visual consciousness. Importantly, the results also indicate that V3 is necessary for visual perception in general, not only for visual consciousness.

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
Elsevier, 2019
Nationell ämneskategori
Etologi
Forskningsämne
Kognitiv neurovetenskap och filosofi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-15614 (URN)10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.11.013 (DOI)29137989 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85034618438 (Scopus ID)
Tillgänglig från: 2018-06-15 Skapad: 2018-06-15 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-12-19Bibliografiskt granskad
Sikka, P., Revonsuo, A., Noreika, V. & Valli, K. (2019). EEG Frontal Alpha Asymmetry and Dream Affect: Alpha Oscillations Over the Right Frontal Cortex During REM Sleep and Pre-Sleep Wakefulness Predict Anger in REM Sleep Dreams. Journal of Neuroscience, 39(24), 4775-4784, Article ID 2884-18.
Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>EEG Frontal Alpha Asymmetry and Dream Affect: Alpha Oscillations Over the Right Frontal Cortex During REM Sleep and Pre-Sleep Wakefulness Predict Anger in REM Sleep Dreams
2019 (Engelska)Ingår i: Journal of Neuroscience, ISSN 0270-6474, E-ISSN 1529-2401, Vol. 39, nr 24, s. 4775-4784, artikel-id 2884-18Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
Abstract [en]

Affective experiences are central not only to our waking life but also to rapid eye movement(REM) sleep dreams. Despite our increasing understanding of the neural correlates of dreaming, we know little about the neural correlates of dream affect. Frontal alpha asymmetry (FAA) is considered a marker of affective states and traits as well as affect regulation in the waking state. Here, we explored whether FAA during REM sleep and during evening resting wakefulness is related to affective experiences in REM sleep dreams. EEG recordings were obtained from 17humanparticipants (7men)whospent 2 nights in the sleep laboratory. Participants were awakened 5minafter the onset of everyREMstage after which they provided a dream report and rated their dream affect. Two-minute preawakening EEG segments were analyzed. Additionally, 8 min of evening presleep and morning postsleep EEG were recorded during resting wakefulness. Mean spectral power in the alpha band (8 –13 Hz and correspondingFAAwere calculated over the frontal (F4-F3) sites. Results showed that FAA during REM sleep, and during evening resting wakefulness, predicted ratings of dream anger. This suggests that individuals with greater alpha power in the right frontal hemisphere may be less able to regulate (i.e., inhibit) strong affective states, such as anger, in dreams. Additionally, FAA was positively correlated across wakefulness and REM sleep. Together, these findings imply that FAA may serve as a neural correlate of affect regulation not only in the waking but also in the dreaming state.

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
Society for Neuroscience, 2019
Nyckelord
anger, dreaming, emotions, frontal alpha asymmetry, REM sleep
Nationell ämneskategori
Naturvetenskap Psykologi
Forskningsämne
Kognitiv neurovetenskap och filosofi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16892 (URN)10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2884-18.2019 (DOI)000471130300011 ()30988168 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85068196629 (Scopus ID)
Tillgänglig från: 2019-05-16 Skapad: 2019-05-16 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-08-06Bibliografiskt granskad
Grassini, S., Valli, K., Souchet, J., Aubret, F., Segurini, G. V., Revonsuo, A. & Koivisto, M. (2019). Pattern matters: Snakes exhibiting triangular and diamond-shaped skin patterns modulate electrophysiological activity in human visual cortex. Neuropsychologia, 131, 62-72
Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Pattern matters: Snakes exhibiting triangular and diamond-shaped skin patterns modulate electrophysiological activity in human visual cortex
Visa övriga...
2019 (Engelska)Ingår i: Neuropsychologia, ISSN 0028-3932, E-ISSN 1873-3514, Vol. 131, s. 62-72Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
Abstract [en]

The neural and perceptual mechanisms that support the efficient visual detection of snakes in humans are still not fully understood. According to the Snake Detection Theory, selection pressures posed by snakes on early primates have shaped the development of the visual system. Previous studies in humans have investigated early visual electrophysiological activity in response to snake images vs. various alternative dangerous or non-dangerous stimuli. These studies have shown that the Early Posterior Negativity (EPN) component is selectively elicited by snake or snake-like images. Recent findings yielded the complementary/alternative hypothesis that early humans (and possibly other primates) evolved an aversion especially for potentially harmful triangular shapes, such as teeth, claws or spikes. In the present study we investigated the effect of triangular and diamond-shaped patterns in snake skins on the ERP correlates of visual processing in humans. In the first experiment, we employed pictures of snakes displaying either triangular/diamond-shaped patterns or no particular pattern on their skins, and pictures of frogs as control. Participants observed a random visual presentation of these pictures. Consistent with previous studies, snakes elicited an enhanced negativity between 225 and 300 ms (EPN) compared to frogs. However, snakes featuring triangular/diamond-shaped patterns on their skin produced an enhanced EPN compared to the snakes that did not display such patterns. In a second experiment we used pictures displaying only skin patterns of snakes and frogs. Results from the second experiment confirmed the results of the first experiment, suggesting that triangular snake-skin patterns modulate the activity in human visual cortex. Taken together, our results constitute an important contribution to the snake detection theory. 

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
Elsevier, 2019
Nyckelord
Snake detection hypothesis, Fear of snake, ERPs, EPN, EEG, Attention
Nationell ämneskategori
Neurovetenskaper
Forskningsämne
Kognitiv neurovetenskap och filosofi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-17238 (URN)10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2019.05.024 (DOI)000493913900006 ()31153966 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85066962862 (Scopus ID)
Tillgänglig från: 2019-06-20 Skapad: 2019-06-20 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-12-19Bibliografiskt granskad
Grassini, S., Revonsuo, A., Castellotti, S., Petrizzo, I., Benedetti, V. & Koivisto, M. (2019). Processing of natural scenery is associated with lower attentional and cognitive load compared with urban ones. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 62, 1-11
Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Processing of natural scenery is associated with lower attentional and cognitive load compared with urban ones
Visa övriga...
2019 (Engelska)Ingår i: Journal of Environmental Psychology, ISSN 0272-4944, E-ISSN 1522-9610, Vol. 62, s. 1-11Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
Abstract [en]

Environmental psychology has provided evidence for psychologically favorable effects of exposure to natural settings, by means of controlled laboratory experiments as well as outdoor field studies. Most of these studies have employed subjective rating scales to assess processes and outcomes of exposure to nature, while only few of them have used physiological measures to assess the neural correlates of these benefits. The present study used electroencephalography (EEG) to explore how the brain engages in processing of images of natural vs. urban scenery. During EEG recording, the participants (n = 32) were presented with a series of photos depicting urban or natural scenery. Participants rated the sceneries for their subjective relaxing value. Images of natural scenery were rated as more relaxing compared to the images of urban scenery. Event related potentials suggested a lower attentional demand for images of natural scenery compared to urban ones. Signal spectral analyses revealed differences in brain activity level and cognitive demand between natural and urban scenery. Our data suggest that the visual perception of natural environments calls for less attentional and cognitive processing, compared with urban ones. © 2019 Elsevier Ltd

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
Academic Press, 2019
Nyckelord
Attention, Attention restoration theory (ART), Cognitive load, EEG, Perception, Environmental psychology
Nationell ämneskategori
Psykologi (exklusive tillämpad psykologi) Neurovetenskaper
Forskningsämne
Kognitiv neurovetenskap och filosofi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16653 (URN)10.1016/j.jenvp.2019.01.007 (DOI)000466252500001 ()2-s2.0-85061318570 (Scopus ID)
Tillgänglig från: 2019-02-22 Skapad: 2019-02-22 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-11-18Bibliografiskt granskad
Kallionpää, R. E., Pesonen, H., Scheinin, A., Sandman, N., Laitio, R., Scheinin, H., . . . Valli, K. (2019). Single-subject analysis of N400 event-related potential component with five different methods. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 144, 14-24
Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Single-subject analysis of N400 event-related potential component with five different methods
Visa övriga...
2019 (Engelska)Ingår i: International Journal of Psychophysiology, ISSN 0167-8760, E-ISSN 1872-7697, Vol. 144, s. 14-24Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
Abstract [en]

There are several different approaches to analyze event-related potentials (ERPs) at single-subject level, and the aim of the current study is to provide information for choosing a method based on its ability to detect ERP effects and factors influencing the results. We used data from 79 healthy participants with EEG referenced to mastoid average and investigated the detection rate of auditory N400 effect in single-subject analysis using five methods: visual inspection of participant-wise averaged ERPs, analysis of variance (ANOVA) for amplitude averages in a time window, cluster-based non-parametric testing, a novel Bayesian approach and Studentized continuous wavelet transform (t-CWT). Visual inspection by three independent raters yielded N400 effect detection in 85% of the participants in at least one paradigm (active responding or passive listening), whereas ANOVA identified the effect in 68%, the cluster-method in 59%, the Bayesian method in 89%, and different versions of t-CWT in 22–59% of the participants. Thus, the Bayesian method was the most liberal and also showed the greatest concordance between the experimental paradigms (active/passive). ANOVA detected significant effect only in cases with converging evidence from other methods. The t-CWT and cluster-based method were the most conservative methods. As we show in the current study, different analysis methods provide results that do not completely overlap. The method of choice for determining the presence of an ERP component at single-subject level thus remains unresolved. Relying on a single statistical method may not be sufficient for drawing conclusions on single-subject ERPs. 

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
Elsevier, 2019
Nyckelord
Data analysis, Electroencephalography, Event-related potentials, N400 evoked potential, Statistical data interpretation, adult, analysis of variance, article, continuous wavelet transform, controlled study, drawing, electroencephalogram, event related potential, evoked response, female, human, human experiment, major clinical study, male, mastoid
Nationell ämneskategori
Neurovetenskaper
Forskningsämne
Kognitiv neurovetenskap och filosofi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-17539 (URN)10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2019.06.012 (DOI)000488144500003 ()31228496 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85070079873 (Scopus ID)
Tillgänglig från: 2019-08-16 Skapad: 2019-08-16 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-11-08Bibliografiskt granskad
Tuominen, J., Stenberg, T., Revonsuo, A. & Valli, K. (2019). Social contents in dreams: An empirical test of the Social Simulation Theory. Consciousness and Cognition, 69, 133-145
Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Social contents in dreams: An empirical test of the Social Simulation Theory
2019 (Engelska)Ingår i: Consciousness and Cognition, ISSN 1053-8100, E-ISSN 1090-2376, Vol. 69, s. 133-145Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
Abstract [en]

Social Simulation Theory (SST) considers the function of dreaming to be the simulation of social events. The Sociality Bias and the Strengthening hypotheses of SST were tested. Social Content Scale (SCS) was developed to quantify social events. Additionally, we attempted to replicate a previous finding (McNamara et al., 2005, Psychological Science) of REM dreams as predisposed to aggressive, and NREM dreams to prosocial interactions. Further, we investigated the frequency and quality of interactions in late vs early REM and NREM dreams. Data consisted of wake, REM and NREM home dream reports (N = 232, 116, 116, respectively) from 15 students. Dreams overrepresented social events compared to wake reports, supporting the Sociality Bias hypothesis. However, the Strengthening Hypothesis was not supported. We weren't able to replicate the McNamara et al. finding, and no time of night effect was found. While SST gained partial support, further research on social contents in dreams is required. © 2019 Elsevier Inc.

Nyckelord
Continuity hypothesis, Dreaming, Functions of dreaming, NREM sleep, REM sleep, Social simulation theory, Sleep, Social Cognition
Nationell ämneskategori
Psykologi (exklusive tillämpad psykologi)
Forskningsämne
Kognitiv neurovetenskap och filosofi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16654 (URN)10.1016/j.concog.2019.01.017 (DOI)000460197200011 ()30769273 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85061351162 (Scopus ID)
Tillgänglig från: 2019-02-22 Skapad: 2019-02-22 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-05-09Bibliografiskt granskad
Hurme, M., Koivisto, M., Revonsuo, A. & Railo, H. (2019). V1 activity during feedforward and early feedback processing is necessary for both conscious and unconscious motion perception. NeuroImage, 185, 313-321
Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>V1 activity during feedforward and early feedback processing is necessary for both conscious and unconscious motion perception
2019 (Engelska)Ingår i: NeuroImage, ISSN 1053-8119, E-ISSN 1095-9572, Vol. 185, s. 313-321Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
Abstract [en]

The study of blindsight has revealed a seminal dissociation between conscious vision and visually guided behavior: some patients who are blind due to V1 lesions seem to be able to employ unconscious visual information in their behavior. The standard assumption is that these findings generalize to the neurologically healthy. We tested whether unconscious processing of motion is possible without the contribution of V1 in neurologically healthy participants by disturbing activity in V1 using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Unconscious processing was measured with redundant target effect (RTE), a phenomenon where participants respond faster to two stimuli than to one stimulus, when the task is just to respond as fast as possible when one stimulus or two simultaneous stimuli are presented. We measured the RTE caused by a motion stimulus. V1 activity was interfered with different stimulus onset asynchronies (SOA) to test whether TMS delivered in a specific time window suppresses conscious perception (participant reports seeing only one of the two stimuli) but does not affect unconscious processing (RTE). We observed that at each SOA, when TMS suppressed conscious perception of the stimulus, the RTE was also eliminated. However, when visibility of the redundant target was suppressed with a visual mask, we found unconscious processing of motion. This suggests that unconscious processing of motion depends on V1 in neurologically healthy humans. We conclude that the neural mechanisms that enable motion processing in blindsight are modulated by neuroplastic changes in connectivity between subcortical areas and the visual cortex after the V1 lesion. Neurologically healthy observers cannot process motion unconsciously without functioning of V1. 

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
Elsevier, 2019
Nyckelord
blindsight, motion perception, redundant target effect, TMS, unconscious vision, V1, adult, article, controlled study, ego development, female, human, human experiment, male, movement perception, stimulus, transcranial magnetic stimulation, visibility, visual cortex
Nationell ämneskategori
Neurovetenskaper Psykologi Produktionsteknik, arbetsvetenskap och ergonomi
Forskningsämne
Kognitiv neurovetenskap och filosofi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16412 (URN)10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.10.058 (DOI)000451628200029 ()30366074 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85055542590 (Scopus ID)
Tillgänglig från: 2018-11-21 Skapad: 2018-11-21 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-02-11Bibliografiskt granskad
Grassini, S., Railo, H., Valli, K., Revonsuo, A. & Koivisto, M. (2019). Visual features and perceptual context modulate attention towards evolutionarily relevant threatening stimuli: Electrophysiological evidence. Emotion, 19(2), 348-364
Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Visual features and perceptual context modulate attention towards evolutionarily relevant threatening stimuli: Electrophysiological evidence
Visa övriga...
2019 (Engelska)Ingår i: Emotion, ISSN 1528-3542, E-ISSN 1931-1516, Vol. 19, nr 2, s. 348-364Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
Abstract [en]

The snake detection hypothesis claims that predatory pressure from snakes has shaped the primate visual system, but we still know very little about how the brain processes evolutionarily important visual cues, and which factors are crucial for quick detection of snakes. We investigated how visual features modulate the electrophysiological markers of early attentional processes. In Experiment 1, we compared snake, rope, gun, and bird images to isolate the effects due to curvilinearity of the stimuli. The results showed that both snake and rope images elicited enhanced P1 and N1 event-related potential components as well as early posterior negativity (EPN). In Experiment 2, we studied whether nonthreatening curvilinear images (i.e., ropes) still elicit the enhanced electrophysiological responses when snake images are not presented as stimuli, and therefore the context does not provoke top-down attention to curvilinear shapes. Rope images still evoked an enhanced EPN, suggesting that curvilinear shapes are preferably captured by attentional processes. However, this effect was smaller than in Experiment 1, in which snake images were present. Thus, our results hint to the possibility that the perceptual context may interact with processing of shape information, drawing attention to curvilinear shapes when the presence of snakes is expectable. Furthermore, we observed that spatial frequency of the visual stimuli modulated especially the early electrophysiological responses, and decreased the differences between stimulus categories in EPN without completely eliminating them. The findings suggest that low-level and high-level mechanisms interact to give an attentional priority to potentially threatening stimuli.

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
American Psychological Association (APA), 2019
Nyckelord
Evolution psychology, ERP
Nationell ämneskategori
Etologi
Forskningsämne
Kognitiv neurovetenskap och filosofi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-15100 (URN)10.1037/emo0000434 (DOI)000458951400014 ()29578746 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85044303603 (Scopus ID)
Tillgänglig från: 2018-04-26 Skapad: 2018-04-26 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-03-07Bibliografiskt granskad
Revonsuo, A. (2018). Biological naturalism and biological realism (1ed.). In: Rocco J. Gennaro (Ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Consciousness: (pp. 188-201). New York: Taylor & Francis
Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Biological naturalism and biological realism
2018 (Engelska)Ingår i: The Routledge Handbook of Consciousness / [ed] Rocco J. Gennaro, New York: Taylor & Francis, 2018, 1, s. 188-201Kapitel i bok, del av antologi (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
Abstract [en]

This chapter summarizes the main principles of Biological Naturalism (BN) and Biological Realism (BR), and analyzes some of their similarities and differences. It contrasts the biological approach represented by BN and BR with another currently influential approach: information theories of consciousness, especially the Information Integration Theory. John Searle appears to accept the two main components of the supervenience relationship between consciousness and the brain: there can be no difference in conscious states without a corresponding difference in the underlying brain states (the covariance principle), and the conscious states owe their existence to the underlying brain states (the principle of ontological dependency). BN fails to offer a coherent account of how the first-person ontology of consciousness is related to the third-person ontology of neurophysiology. Searle suggests that BN solves (or dissolves) the philosophical mind-body problem, but this turns out to be a mere promissory note.

Ort, förlag, år, upplaga, sidor
New York: Taylor & Francis, 2018 Upplaga: 1
Nationell ämneskategori
Filosofi Neurovetenskaper
Forskningsämne
Kognitiv neurovetenskap och filosofi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-16056 (URN)10.4324/9781315676982 (DOI)000462276300015 ()2-s2.0-85046930629 (Scopus ID)9781317386810 (ISBN)9781138936218 (ISBN)9781315676982 (ISBN)
Tillgänglig från: 2018-09-10 Skapad: 2018-09-10 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-04-23Bibliografiskt granskad
Laaksonen, L., Kallioinen, M., Långsjö, J., Laitio, T., Scheinin, A., Scheinin, J., . . . Scheinin, H. (2018). Comparative effects of dexmedetomidine, propofol, sevoflurane, and S-ketamine on regional cerebral glucose metabolism in humans: a positron emission tomography study. Paper presented at 10th International Symposium on Memory and Awareness in Anesthesia (MAA), Helsinki, Finland, June 19-21, 2017. British Journal of Anaesthesia, 121(1), 281-290
Öppna denna publikation i ny flik eller fönster >>Comparative effects of dexmedetomidine, propofol, sevoflurane, and S-ketamine on regional cerebral glucose metabolism in humans: a positron emission tomography study
Visa övriga...
2018 (Engelska)Ingår i: British Journal of Anaesthesia, ISSN 0007-0912, E-ISSN 1471-6771, Vol. 121, nr 1, s. 281-290Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat) Published
Abstract [en]

IntroductionThe highly selective α2-agonist dexmedetomidine has become a popular sedative for neurointensive care patients. However, earlier studies have raised concern that dexmedetomidine might reduce cerebral blood flow without a concomitant decrease in metabolism. Here, we compared the effects of dexmedetomidine on the regional cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglu) with three commonly used anaesthetic drugs at equi-sedative doses.

MethodsOne hundred and sixty healthy male subjects were randomised to EC50 for verbal command of dexmedetomidine (1.5 ng ml−1n=40), propofol (1.7 μg ml−1n=40), sevoflurane (0.9% end-tidal; n=40) or S-ketamine (0.75 μg ml−1n=20) or placebo (n=20). Anaesthetics were administered using target-controlled infusion or vapouriser with end-tidal monitoring. 18F-labelled fluorodeoxyglucose was administered 20 min after commencement of anaesthetic administration, and high-resolution positron emission tomography with arterial blood activity samples was used to quantify absolute CMRglu for whole brain and 15 brain regions.

ResultsAt the time of [F18]fluorodeoxyglucose injection, 55% of dexmedetomidine, 45% of propofol, 85% of sevoflurane, 45% of S-ketamine, and 0% of placebo subjects were unresponsive. Whole brain CMRglu was 63%, 71%, 71%, and 96% of placebo in the dexmedetomidine, propofol, sevoflurane, and S-ketamine groups, respectively (P<0.001 between the groups). The lowest CMRglu was observed in nearly all brain regions with dexmedetomidine (P<0.05 compared with all other groups). With S-ketamine, CMRgludid not differ from placebo.

ConclusionsAt equi-sedative doses in humans, potency in reducing CMRglu was dexmedetomidine>propofol>ketamine=placebo. These findings alleviate concerns for dexmedetomidine-induced vasoconstriction and cerebral ischaemia.

Nationell ämneskategori
Övrig annan medicin och hälsovetenskap
Forskningsämne
Kognitiv neurovetenskap och filosofi
Identifikatorer
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-15615 (URN)10.1016/j.bja.2018.04.008 (DOI)000439025500072 ()29935583 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85046622088 (Scopus ID)
Konferens
10th International Symposium on Memory and Awareness in Anesthesia (MAA), Helsinki, Finland, June 19-21, 2017
Tillgänglig från: 2018-06-15 Skapad: 2018-06-15 Senast uppdaterad: 2019-11-19Bibliografiskt granskad
Organisationer
Identifikatorer
ORCID-id: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-2771-1588

Sök vidare i DiVA

Visa alla publikationer