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Preece, D. A., Petrova, K., Mehta, A., Sikka, P. & Gross, J. J. (2024). Alexithymia or general psychological distress?: Discriminant validity of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale and the Perth Alexithymia Questionnaire. Journal of Affective Disorders, 352, 140-145
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alexithymia or general psychological distress?: Discriminant validity of the Toronto Alexithymia Scale and the Perth Alexithymia Questionnaire
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2024 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 352, p. 140-145Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: Alexithymia is an important transdiagnostic risk factor for emotion-based psychopathologies. However, it remains unclear whether alexithymia questionnaires actually measure alexithymia, or whether they measure emotional distress. Our aim here was to address this discriminant validity concern via exploratory factor analysis (EFA) of the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) and the Perth Alexithymia Questionnaire (PAQ). Method: United States general community adults (N = 508) completed the TAS-20, PAQ, and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales-21 (DASS-21). EFA was used to examine the latent dimensions underlying these measures' scores. Results: Our EFA extracted two higher-order factors, an “alexithymia” factor and a “general distress” factor (i.e., depression, anxiety, stress). All PAQ scores loaded cleanly on the alexithymia factor, with no cross-loadings on the distress factor. However, for the TAS-20, Difficulty Identifying Feelings (DIF) facet scores cross-loaded highly on the distress factor. Limitations: Our sample consisted of general community adults; future work in clinical settings will be useful. Conclusions: Our data indicate that the PAQ has good discriminant validity. However, the TAS-20 appears to have significant discriminant validity problems, in that much of the variance in its DIF facet reflects people's current levels of distress, rather than alexithymia. The TAS-20, which has traditionally been the most widely used alexithymia questionnaire, may therefore not be the optimal alexithymia tool. Our findings add to the body of evidence supporting the validity and utility of the PAQ and suggest that, moving forward, it is a superior option to the TAS-20 for alexithymia assessments.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2024
Keywords
Alexithymia, Discriminant validity, Distress, Perth Alexithymia Questionnaire, Toronto Alexithymia Scale
National Category
Psychiatry Applied Psychology Other Health Sciences Psychology Natural Sciences
Research subject
Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-23638 (URN)10.1016/j.jad.2024.01.271 (DOI)38320659 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85185601431 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY 4.0 DEED

 © 2024 The Author(s)

Correspondence Address: D.A. Preece; Curtin University, School of Psychology, Bentley, Kent Street, 6102, Australia; email: david.preece@curtin.edu.au; CODEN: JADID

Funding: None.

Available from: 2024-02-29 Created: 2024-02-29 Last updated: 2024-03-13Bibliographically approved
Sikka, P., Tuominen, J., Ezquerro Nassar, A., Kirberg, M., Loukola, V., Revonsuo, A., . . . Noreika, V. (2024). COVID-19 on mind: Daily worry about the coronavirus is linked to negative affect experienced during mind-wandering and dreaming. Emotion, 24(1), 177-195
Open this publication in new window or tab >>COVID-19 on mind: Daily worry about the coronavirus is linked to negative affect experienced during mind-wandering and dreaming
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2024 (English)In: Emotion, ISSN 1528-3542, E-ISSN 1931-1516, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 177-195Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Despite a surge of studies on the effects of COVID-19 on our well-being, we know little about how the pandemic is reflected in people's spontaneous thoughts and experiences, such as mind-wandering (or daydreaming) during wakefulness and dreaming during sleep. We investigated whether and how COVID-19-related general concern, anxiety, and daily worry are associated with the daily fluctuation of the affective quality of mind-wandering and dreaming, and to what extent these associations can be explained by poor sleep quality. We used ecological momentary assessment by asking participants to rate the affect they experienced during mind-wandering and dreaming in daily logs over a 2-week period. Our preregistered analyses based on 1,755 dream logs from 172 individuals and 1,496 mind-wandering logs from 152 individuals showed that, on days when people reported higher levels of negative affect and lower levels of positive affect during mind-wandering, they experienced more worry. Only daily sleep quality was associated with affect experienced during dreaming at the within-person level: on nights with poorer sleep quality people reported experiencing more negative and less positive affect in dreams and were more likely to experience nightmares. However, at the between-person level, individuals who experienced more daily COVID-19 worry during the study period also reported experiencing more negative affect during mind-wandering and during dreaming. As such, the continuity between daily and nightly experiences seems to rely more on stable trait-like individual differences in affective processing. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2024
Keywords
COVID-19, emotion, spontaneous thought, mind-wandering, dreaming
National Category
Psychology (excluding Applied Psychology) Natural Sciences
Research subject
Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-23029 (URN)10.1037/emo0001255 (DOI)001019066500001 ()37347885 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85170223093 (Scopus ID)
Note

Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Pilleriin Sikka, Department of Psychology, Stanford University, 450 Jane Stanford Way, Stanford, CA 94305, United States. Email: sikka@stanford.edu

Available from: 2023-07-13 Created: 2023-07-13 Last updated: 2024-02-14Bibliographically approved
Sikka, P. & Gross, J. J. (2023). Affect Across the Wake-Sleep Cycle. Affective Science, 4, 563-569
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Affect Across the Wake-Sleep Cycle
2023 (English)In: Affective Science, ISSN 2662-2041, Vol. 4, p. 563-569Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Affective scientists traditionally have focused on periods of active wakefulness when people are responding to external stimuli or engaging in specific tasks. However, we live much of our lives immersed in experiences not related to the current environment or tasks at hand—mind-wandering (or daydreaming) during wakefulness and dreaming during sleep. Despite being disconnected from the immediate environment, our brains still generate affect during such periods. Yet, research on stimulus-independent affect has remained largely separate from affective science. Here, we suggest that one key future direction for affective science will be to expand our field of view by integrating the wealth of findings from research on mind-wandering, sleep, and dreaming to provide a more comprehensive account of affect across the wake-sleep cycle. In developing our argument, we address two key issues: affect variation across the wake-sleep cycle, and the benefits of expanding the study of affect across the full wake-sleep cycle. In considering these issues, we highlight the methodological and clinical implications for affective science. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2023
Keywords
Affect coherence, Affect dynamics, Affect regulation, Dreaming, Mind-wandering, Sleep
National Category
Neurosciences
Research subject
Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-23083 (URN)10.1007/s42761-023-00204-2 (DOI)001044341000001 ()2-s2.0-85166439811 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY 4.0

© 2023, The Author(s).

Published online: 2 August 2023

Correspondence Address: P. Sikka; Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, 450 Jane Stanford Way, 94305, United States; email: sikka@stanford.edu

This work was supported by research grants from the Finnish Foundations’ Post Doc Pool (to P.S.), Emil Aaltonen Foundation (to P.S.), and Finnish Cultural Foundation (to P.S.). We would like to thank Dr. Maia ten Brink and Kate Petrova for valuable comments on the manuscript.

Available from: 2023-08-10 Created: 2023-08-10 Last updated: 2023-12-19Bibliographically approved
Preece, D. A., Mehta, A., Petrova, K., Sikka, P., Bjureberg, J., Becerra, R. & Gross, J. J. (2023). Alexithymia and emotion regulation. Journal of Affective Disorders, 324, 232-238
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Alexithymia and emotion regulation
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 324, p. 232-238Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

Alexithymia is a key transdiagnostic risk factor for emotion-based psychopathologies. Conceptual models specify that this is because alexithymia impairs emotion regulation. However, the extent of these putative emotion regulation impairments remains underexplored. Our aim in this study was to begin to address this gap by examining whether people with high, average, or low levels of alexithymia differ in the types of emotion regulation strategies they typically use.

Method

General community adults from the United States (N = 501) completed a battery of alexithymia and emotion regulation measures. Participants were grouped into high, average, and low alexithymia quantiles.

Results

After controlling for demographics and current levels of distress, the high, average, and low alexithymia groups differed in their use of cognitive and behavioral emotion regulation strategies. Compared to the other groups, the high alexithymia group reported lesser use of generally adaptive regulation strategies (cognitive reappraisal, approaching problems, and seeking social support) and greater use of generally maladaptive regulation strategies (expressive suppression, behavioral withdrawal, ignoring).

Limitations

Our data were cross-sectional and from self-report questionnaires. Future work in other cultural groups would be beneficial.

Conclusions

Our results support the view that alexithymia is associated with impaired emotion regulation. In particular, people with high alexithymia seem to exhibit a less adaptive profile of emotion regulation strategies. Direct targeting of these emotion regulation patterns in psychotherapy may therefore be a useful pathway for the treatment of emotional disorder symptoms in people with high alexithymia.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
alexithymia, emotion regulation, individual differences, strategies, cognitive, behavioral, process model of emotion regulation
National Category
Natural Sciences Psychology
Research subject
Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-22167 (URN)10.1016/j.jad.2022.12.065 (DOI)000918362600001 ()36566943 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85145730520 (Scopus ID)
Note

Available online 23 December 2022

Available from: 2023-01-01 Created: 2023-01-01 Last updated: 2023-02-16Bibliographically approved
Sikka, P., Revonsuo, A. & Gross, J. J. (2023). Individual differences in peace of mind reflect adaptive emotion regulation. Personality and Individual Differences, 215, Article ID 112378.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Individual differences in peace of mind reflect adaptive emotion regulation
2023 (English)In: Personality and Individual Differences, ISSN 0191-8869, E-ISSN 1873-3549, Vol. 215, article id 112378Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Well-being consists of several different dimensions, such as hedonic and eudaimonic well-being. However, peace of mind (PoM)—an aspect of well-being characterized by internal peace and harmony—has only recently begun to receive attention. It has been shown that PoM predicts important outcomes, such as depression and anxiety. An open question is what underlies individual differences in PoM. One important factor may be emotion regulation. However, to date, no studies have been conducted on PoM and emotion regulation. Here, we investigated the relationship between individual differences in PoM and trait emotion regulation. In two studies, participants from Finland (Study 1, N = 417) and the US (Study 2, N = 303) completed measures of PoM, trait emotion regulation, and other aspects of well-being and ill-being. Results showed that people with higher levels of PoM displayed a greater tendency to use cognitive reappraisal and a lesser tendency to use expressive suppression. Our findings suggest that adaptive emotion regulation may play an important role in explaining PoM and may serve as a promising target for interventions designed to enhance PoM. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Cognitive reappraisal, Emotion regulation, Expressive suppression, Happiness, Peace of mind, Well-being
National Category
Neurosciences
Research subject
Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-23186 (URN)10.1016/j.paid.2023.112378 (DOI)001070485000001 ()2-s2.0-85169051196 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY 4.0

© 2023 The Authors

Corresponding author at: Department of Psychology, Stanford University, 420 Jane Stanford Way, 94305 Stanford, CA, USA. E-mail address: sikka@stanford.edu (P. Sikka).

Available from: 2023-09-07 Created: 2023-09-07 Last updated: 2023-12-19Bibliographically approved
Blackburn, A. M., Han, H., Gelpí, R. A., Stöckli, S., Jeftić, A., Ch'ng, B., . . . Vestergren, S. (2023). Mediation analysis of conspiratorial thinking and anti-expert sentiments on vaccine willingness. Health Psychology, 42(4), 235-246
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Mediation analysis of conspiratorial thinking and anti-expert sentiments on vaccine willingness
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2023 (English)In: Health Psychology, ISSN 0278-6133, E-ISSN 1930-7810, Vol. 42, no 4, p. 235-246Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: Vaccines are an effective means to reduce the spread of diseases, but they are sometimes met with hesitancy that needs to be understood. Method: In this study, we analyzed data from a large, cross-country survey conducted between June and August 2021 in 43 countries (N = 15,740) to investigate the roles of trust in government and science in shaping vaccine attitudes and willingness to be vaccinated. Results: Despite significant variability between countries, we found that both forms of institutional trust were associated with a higher willingness to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Furthermore, we found that conspiratorial thinking and anti-expert sentiments predicted reduced trust in government and science, respectively, and that trust mediated the relationship between these two constructs and ultimate vaccine attitudes. Although most countries displayed similar relationships between conspiratorial thinking and anti-expert sentiments, trust in government and science, and vaccine attitudes, we identified three countries (Brazil, Honduras, and Russia) that demonstrated significantly altered associations between the examined variables in terms of significant random slopes. Conclusions: Cross-country differences suggest that local governments’ support for COVID-19 prevention policies can influence populations’ vaccine attitudes. These findings provide insight for policymakers to develop interventions aiming to increase trust in the institutions involved in the vaccination process.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
American Psychological Association (APA), 2023
Keywords
anti-expert sentiments, conspiratorial thinking, vaccine hesitancy, trust, government
National Category
Natural Sciences Psychology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience; Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-22483 (URN)10.1037/hea0001268 (DOI)000964769600002 ()37023325 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85151864291 (Scopus ID)
Note

the COVIDiSTRESS II Consortium

Available from: 2023-05-02 Created: 2023-05-02 Last updated: 2023-08-23Bibliographically approved
Preece, D. A., Mehta, A., Petrova, K., Sikka, P., Bjureberg, J., Chen, W., . . . Gross, J. J. (2023). The Perth Alexithymia Questionnaire-Short Form (PAQ-S): A 6-item measure of alexithymia. Journal of Affective Disorders, 325, 493-501
Open this publication in new window or tab >>The Perth Alexithymia Questionnaire-Short Form (PAQ-S): A 6-item measure of alexithymia
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2023 (English)In: Journal of Affective Disorders, ISSN 0165-0327, E-ISSN 1573-2517, Vol. 325, p. 493-501Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Alexithymia is a trait characterized by difficulties identifying feelings, difficulties describing feelings, and externally orientated thinking. It is widely regarded as an important transdiagnostic risk factor for a range of psychopathologies, including depressive and anxiety disorders. Whilst several well-validated psychometric measures of alexithymia exist, these are relatively lengthy, thus limiting their utility in time-pressured settings. In this paper, we address this gap by introducing and validating a brief 6-item version of the Perth Alexithymia Questionnaire, called the Perth Alexithymia Questionnaire-Short Form (PAQ-S). METHOD: Across two studies with adult samples (Study 1 N = 508 United States community; Study 2 = 378 Australian college students), we examined the psychometric properties of the PAQ-S in terms of its factor structure, reliability, and concurrent/criterion validity. RESULTS: In exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses, all PAQ-S items loaded well on a single general alexithymia factor. The PAQ-S total score had high reliability, and correlated as expected with the long-form of the PAQ, as well as other established markers of alexithymia, emotion regulation, and affective disorder symptoms. LIMITATIONS: Our samples were general community or college student samples from two Western countries; future validation work in clinical samples and more diverse cultural groups is thus needed. CONCLUSIONS: The PAQ-S retains the psychometric strengths of the PAQ. As such, the PAQ-S can be used as a quick, robust measure of overall alexithymia levels. The introduction of the PAQ-S hence enables valid assessments of alexithymia in a more diverse range of settings and research designs. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2023
Keywords
Adult, Affective Symptoms, Australia, Emotions, Humans, Psychometrics, Reproducibility of Results, Surveys and Questionnaires, emotion, emotional disorder, human, psychology, psychometry, questionnaire, reproducibility, Alexithymia, Assessment, Perth Alexithymia Questionnaire
National Category
Psychiatry Natural Sciences Psychology
Research subject
Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-22298 (URN)10.1016/j.jad.2023.01.036 (DOI)000963194200001 ()36642314 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85147790290 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY 4.0 DEED

© 2023 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Corresponding author at: Curtin University, School of Psychology, Kent Street, Bentley 6102, WA, Australia. E-mail address: david.preece@curtin.edu.au (D.A. Preece)

Funding: None.

Available from: 2023-02-23 Created: 2023-02-23 Last updated: 2023-11-28Bibliographically approved
COVIDiSTRESS II Consortium, . (2022). COVIDiSTRESS diverse dataset on psychological and behavioural outcomes one year into the COVID-19 pandemic. Scientific Data, 9(1), Article ID 331.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>COVIDiSTRESS diverse dataset on psychological and behavioural outcomes one year into the COVID-19 pandemic
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2022 (English)In: Scientific Data, E-ISSN 2052-4463, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 331Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

During the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, the COVIDiSTRESS Consortium launched an open-access global survey to understand and improve individuals’ experiences related to the crisis. A year later, we extended this line of research by launching a new survey to address the dynamic landscape of the pandemic. This survey was released with the goal of addressing diversity, equity, and inclusion by working with over 150 researchers across the globe who collected data in 48 languages and dialects across 137 countries. The resulting cleaned dataset described here includes 15,740 of over 20,000 responses. The dataset allows cross-cultural study of psychological wellbeing and behaviours a year into the pandemic. It includes measures of stress, resilience, vaccine attitudes, trust in government and scientists, compliance, and information acquisition and misperceptions regarding COVID-19. Open-access raw and cleaned datasets with computed scores are available. Just as our initial COVIDiSTRESS dataset has facilitated government policy decisions regarding health crises, this dataset can be used by researchers and policy makers to inform research, decisions, and policy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer Nature, 2022
Keywords
COVID-19, health, well-being, stress, resilience, trust, vaccines, compliance, cross-cultural
National Category
Natural Sciences Psychology Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-21384 (URN)10.1038/s41597-022-01383-6 (DOI)000814276800004 ()35729305 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85132297882 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC-BY 4.0

The COVIDiSTRESS II Consortium

A list of authors and their affiliations appears at the end of the paper. e-mail: angelique.blackburn@tamiu.edu; s.vestergren@keele.ac.uk

Published: 21 June 2022

Author correction in: Scientific Data, Volume 10, Issue 1, December 2023, Article number 12. doi:10.1038/s41597-022-01896-0

Available from: 2022-06-22 Created: 2022-06-22 Last updated: 2023-03-14Bibliographically approved
Railo, H., Varjonen, A., Lehtonen, M. & Sikka, P. (2022). Event-related potential correlates of learning to produce novel foreign phonemes. Neurobiology of Language, 3(4), 599-614
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Event-related potential correlates of learning to produce novel foreign phonemes
2022 (English)In: Neurobiology of Language, E-ISSN 2641-4368, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 599-614Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Learning to pronounce a foreign phoneme requires an individual to acquire a motor program that enables the reproduction of the new acoustic target sound. This process is largely based on the use of auditory feedback to detect pronunciation errors to adjust vocalization. While early auditory evoked neural activity underlies automatic detection and adaptation to vocalization errors, little is known about the neural correlates of acquiring novel speech targets. To investigate the neural processes that mediate the learning of foreign phoneme pronunciation, we recorded event-related potentials (ERP) when participants (N=19) pronounced native or foreign phonemes. Behavioral results indicated that the participants’ pronunciation of the foreign phoneme improved during the experiment. Early auditory responses (N1 and P2 waves, approx. 85–290 ms after the sound onset) revealed no differences between foreign and native phonemes. In contrast, the amplitude of the frontocentrally distributed late slow wave (LSW, 320–440 ms) was modulated by the pronunciation of the foreign phonemes, and the effect changed during the experiment, paralleling the improvement in pronunciation. These results suggest that the LSW may reflect higher-order monitoring processes that signal successful pronunciation and help learn novel phonemes. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
MIT Press, 2022
Keywords
Speaking Induced Suppression, event-related potential, ERP, phoneme learning
National Category
Neurosciences Psychology
Research subject
Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-21901 (URN)10.1162/nol_a_00080 (DOI)000911645200005 ()37215343 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85143209383 (Scopus ID)
Funder
The Research Council of Norway, 223265
Note

CC BY 4.0

September 21 2022

Corresponding author Henry Railo ,Assistentinkatu 7, Department of Psychology and Speech-Language Pathology, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Turku, Finland e-mail: henry.railo(at)utu.fi

We thank Ita Puusepp for help with the ratings. M.L. was partly supported by the Research Council of Norway through its Centers of Excellence funding scheme (project number 223265). P.S. was supported by a research grant from the Alfred Kordelin Foundation, and by a research grant from the Emil Aaltonen Foundation. We thank Teemu Laine for help with the experimental set up and equipment.

Available from: 2022-10-03 Created: 2022-10-03 Last updated: 2023-08-22Bibliographically approved
Sikka, P., Engelbrektsson, H., Zhang, J. & Gross, J. J. (2022). Negative dream affect is associated with next-day affect level, but not with affect reactivity or affect regulation. Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, 16, Article ID 981289.
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Negative dream affect is associated with next-day affect level, but not with affect reactivity or affect regulation
2022 (English)In: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, ISSN 1662-5153, E-ISSN 1662-5153, Vol. 16, article id 981289Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

There is increasing evidence that sleep plays an important role inaffective processing. However, it is unclear whether dreaming—the subjectiveexperiences we have during sleep—also serves an affect regulation function.Here, we investigated the within-person relationship between negative affectexperienced in dreams and next-day waking affect level, affect reactivity,and affect regulation. For 5 days, 40 participants reported their dreams andrated their dream affect and post-sleep waking affect level upon morningawakening. Thereafter, they performed an affect reactivity and regulation taskwhich involved viewing neutral and negative pictures with the instructioneither to simply view the pictures or to down-regulate the affect evoked bythese pictures. Multilevel regression analyses showed that the more negativeaffect people experienced in their dreams at night, the more negative affectand the less positive affect they reported the next morning. However, negativedream affect was associated neither with affect reactivity to the pictures norwith the ability to down-regulate negative affect in response to these pictures.In fact, Bayesian analyses favored the null hypotheses. These findings fail toprovide support for the affect regulation function of dreaming and, instead,speak for affective continuity between dreaming and post-sleep wakefulness.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Frontiers Media S.A., 2022
Keywords
emotion, emotion regulation, dreaming
National Category
Natural Sciences Psychology
Research subject
Consciousness and Cognitive Neuroscience
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:his:diva-21971 (URN)10.3389/fnbeh.2022.981289 (DOI)000879209500001 ()36338877 (PubMedID)2-s2.0-85141360036 (Scopus ID)
Note

CC BY 4.0

CORRESPONDENCE

Pilleriin Sikkasikka@stanford.edu; pilsik@utu.fi; pilleriin.sikka@his.se

Available from: 2022-10-19 Created: 2022-10-19 Last updated: 2023-07-12Bibliographically approved
Organisations
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ORCID iD: ORCID iD iconorcid.org/0000-0002-1926-6138

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